Catalogue description National Coal Board: Chairman's Office: Aberfan Tip Disaster Correspondence and Papers

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Details of COAL 73
Reference: COAL 73
Title: National Coal Board: Chairman's Office: Aberfan Tip Disaster Correspondence and Papers
Description:

The records in this series cover the correspondence to the Chairman of the National Coal Board on the subject of the Aberfan disaster of October 1966, and subsequent events. This included the debate over whether the chairman should resign. There are also papers relating to internal communications on the subject.

Date: 1966-1972
Related material:

Records of the Aberfan disaster generated at Merthyr Vale Colliery and at the area and regional offices are deposited in the Glamorgan Record Office, Cardiff.

For other files relating to the Aberfan disaster see BD 52

Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record(s)
Language: English
Creator:

National Coal Board, Chairmans Office, 1947-1987

Physical description: 38 file(s)
Access conditions: Open
Administrative / biographical background:

At the time of the Aberfan disaster in October 1966, the Chairman of the National Coal Board, Lord Robens of Woldingham, was supported in his private office by a secretary and a team of three staff officers (plus clerical staff). This organisation was in place prior to the event and continued for some years afterwards, into the chairmanship of Sir Derek Ezra.

The Chairman's Office was responsible for the administration of the considerable amount of correspondence which was received by the chairman from the public, and for coordinating replies. It also briefed the chairman for meetings and visits, and a member of the office frequently accompanied him on visits. A representative of the office attended policy making committee meetings at headquarters and there was also a role liaising with Directors General.

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