Catalogue description Supreme Court of Judicature, High Court of Justice, King's Bench Division: Crown Office: Registers of Appeals

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Details of KB 174
Reference: KB 174
Title: Supreme Court of Judicature, High Court of Justice, King's Bench Division: Crown Office: Registers of Appeals
Description:

This series consists of leather-bound registers of appeals created by the Crown Office (now known as the Administrative Court) containing case listings and outcomes.

'Civil paper' relates to matters brought by private individuals; 'Crown paper' relates to matters commenced by the State.

Date: 1905-1910
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record(s)
Language: English
Creator:

Supreme Court of Judicature, Crown Office, 1879-

Supreme Court of Judicature, Kings Bench Division, 1901-1952

Physical description: 48 volume(s)
Physical condition: Leather bound volumes, some covers deteriorating
Access conditions: Open
Immediate source of acquisition:

Ministry of Justice , in 2013

Accruals: No further accruals are expected.
Administrative / biographical background:

The work of the Administrative Court is varied, consisting of the administrative law jurisdiction of England and Wales as well as a supervisory jurisdiction over inferior courts and tribunals, exercised in the main through the procedure of Judicial Review, which covers persons or bodies exercising a public law function. Examples of the types of decision which may fall within the range of Judicial Review include certain decisions of local authorities, certain decisions of the immigration authorities and Immigration Appellate Authority, decisions of regulatory bodies, and decisions relating to prisoner's rights. The work is divided between single Judge courts and Divisional Courts (which consist of at least two judges and normally consist of a Lord Justice of Appeal sitting with a judge of the High Court).

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