Catalogue description Home, Norfolk and South-Eastern Circuits

Details of Division within ASSI
Reference: Division within ASSI
Title: Home, Norfolk and South-Eastern Circuits
Description:

Records of the Home Circuit, Norfolk Circuit and South-Eastern Circuit of the Justice of Assize.

They are in ASSI 16, ASSI 32-ASSI 40, ASSI 90, ASSI 94 and ASSI 95

Date: 1554-1971
Arrangement:

Surrey was not incorporated in the South-Eastern Circuit until 1893 but its records for the period when it was not attached were subsequently filed with those of the circuit.

Separated material:

A single record for the Home Circuit is in PRO 30/26/104

For a further South-Eastern Circuit record see also PRO 30/74

Legal status: Public Record(s)
Language: English
Creator:

Justices of Assize, Home Circuit, 1541-1876

Justices of Assize, Norfolk Circuit, 1541-1876

Justices of Assize, South-Eastern Circuit, 1876-1971

Physical description: 14 series
Administrative / biographical background:

As a result of the reform of 1876 which rearranged the assize circuits, the Home Circuit and some of the Norfolk Circuit were combined to create the South Eastern Circuit. It should be noted that the jurisdiction of the Central Criminal Court, which embraces London and Middlesex, also extended over parts of the counties of Essex, Kent and Surrey form 1834.

The Home Circuit comprised Essex, Surrey, Hertfordshire, Sussex and Kent. On the abolition of the circuit all the above counties were incorporated in a newly created South-Eastern Circuit, apart from Surrey, which was unattached, until being similarly transferred by a further order in Council of 28 July 1893.

Prior to 1876, the Norfolk Circuit comprised Bedfordshire, Norfolk, Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, Cambridgeshire, Rutland, Huntingdonshire, Suffolk and Leicestershire.

The South-Eastern Circuit comprised Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, Essex, Suffolk Hertfordshire, Surrey (from 1893), Huntingdonshire, Sussex and Kent.

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