A COLLECTION of such Reasons and Arguments together with sundry records proving that the island of Raghlin, Rathrim, or Raghery, in Ireland, now in the possession of Sir Randall McDonell, is parcel of Ireland, and no parcel of Scotland, as is supposed.

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Details of A COLLECTION of such Reasons and Arguments together with sundry records proving that the island of Raghlin, Rathrim, or Raghery, in Ireland, now in the possession of Sir Randall McDonell, is parcel of Ireland, and no parcel of Scotland, as is supposed.
Title: A COLLECTION of such Reasons and Arguments together with sundry records proving that the island of Raghlin, Rathrim, or Raghery, in Ireland, now in the possession of Sir Randall McDonell, is parcel of Ireland, and no parcel of Scotland, as is supposed.
Description:

Sir. Randall McDonnel's Second Brief.

 

(1.) The first reason as in brief 1.

 

(2.) As in 1st brief.

 

(3.) The 3rd reason is drawn from the jurisdiction, both spiritual and temporal used and exacted within this island of Rathlin. First, for the spiritual jurisdiction, it has always been within the diocese of Connor, a bishopric of Ireland, and subject to the visitation of the bishop thereof, for which the said bishop doth receive yearly a proxie of 20 shillings out of that island; whereas all the other islands which lie on the north-west coast of Scotland, are under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of the Isles, but in this island of Rathlin, the Bishop of the Isles had never any jurisdiction. For the temporal jurisdiction, this island is parcel of co. Antrim in Ulster, and the sheriff of that county has ever executed the King's writs there, and the inhabitants of that island have ever appeared and served at the assizes and general sessions holden at Knockfergus for that county, and upon their default have been fined. Neither did any of the inhabitants there to excuse their appearance, or to save their fines, ever allege that the island was part of Scotland, and no part of Ireland, which they would have done if they had conceived that it had been part of Scotland. And on the other side, this island was never reputed or claimed to be part of any sheriffdom, bailiwick, or stewardship in the kingdom of Scotland; neither did the temporal officers of Scotland use any jurisdiction there.

 

(4.) The fourth reason is drawn from the long continuance of possession in the Crown of England, or in such held, or claimed this island from or under the Crown of England.

 

(5.) Same as in 1st brief.

 

(6.) The sixth as before.

 

Hereafter ensue sundry copies of records remaining in his Majesty's Tower of London and elsewhere, which manifestly prove the said island to be part of the kingdom of Ireland.

 

14 John, King.

 

The Bishop of Norwich did signify unto King John that Allan Gallwaye had sent his uncle and other persons unto him, being then in Ireland, to receive the lands his Majesty had conferred upon him, and that he being then at Knockfergus, accompanied with divers knights and other persons of quality, did assign unto the said Allan Gallwaye divers lands with the isle of Rathlin, excepting all ecclesiastical rights, and such things as did appertain to the spiritual jurisdiction.

 

17 John, King.

 

King John did give, grant, and confirm the said lands, together with the island of Rathlin, in Ireland, unto Allan FitzRolland and his heirs.

 

Teste at Westmon: 4 H. 3, 18th April.

 

King Henry III. did signify by his letter unto Allan Gallwaye, that one Hamo de Gallway did earnestly solicit him in his behalf to re-deliver unto him his lands, affirming that the said Allan, was ready to do homage for the said lands which his father, King John, had given unto him. And thereupon K. Henry advertised the said Allan that he and a great part of his Council were to be in York, and his well beloved Alexander, King of Scotland, with a great part of his Council, to confer of certain affairs concerning both their kingdoms, and therefore commanded the said Allan that he should come thither to do his homage and fealty.

 

Teste at York, 4 H. 3, June 16.

 

Allan de Gallwaye did fealty unto K. Henry 3, for the said lands together with the island of Rathlin, and thereupon the King commanded his Justices of Ireland without delay to put him in full possession thereof.

 

6 Ed. 1.

 

By virtue of a writ directed by King Edward I. to Robert Ufford, his Justice of Ireland, it was found, by an inquisition taken at Cull, in the province of Ulster, that John Bissett died seized of the island of Raghery, and did hold the same of Richard Burgo, son and heir of Walter Burgo. This inquisition being taken at Cull, in the county of Antrim, and found by a jury of that county, doth sufficiently prove the said island to be part of that county, and also the temporal jurisdiction there.

Date: 1617
Held by: Lambeth Palace Library, not available at The National Archives
Language: English
Unpublished Finding Aids:
  • Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 189.

Former Reference Department: MS 613, p. 5

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