Arundell of Lanherne and Trerice

This record is held by Cornwall Record Office

Details of Arundell of Lanherne and Trerice
Title: Arundell of Lanherne and Trerice
Reference: AR
Description:

AR/1 Title Deeds

 

AR/2 Manorial Records

 

Estate Management

 

AR/3 Estate Management Papers

 

AR/4 Leases

 

AR/5 Letting Surveys and Contracts for Leases

 

AR/6 Surveys and Valuations

 

AR/7 Bonds

 

AR/8 Financial Records

 

AR/9 Miscellaneous Estate Papers

 

AR/10 Estate Correspondence

 

AR/11 Farm Records

 

AR/12 Household Records

 

AR/13 Records of Employees

 

AR/14 Tin and Mining Records

 

AR/15 Records relating to Right of Wreck

 

AR/16 Ecclesiastical Records

 

AR/17 Legal Records

 

AR/18 Maps and Plans

 

Family Papers

 

AR/19 Marriage, Jointure and Dowry

 

AR/20 Family Trusts

 

AR/21 Probate

 

AR/22 Public Office

 

AR/23 Royal Pardons and Licences

 

AR/24 Arundells in Administrative Roles

 

AR/25 Personal Correspondence

 

AR/26 Personal Financial Papers

 

AR/27 Religion

 

AR/28 Recusancy

 

AR/29 Genealogy

 

AR/30 Miscellaneous Family Papers

 

AR/31-47 Records of Other Families

 

AR/48 Printed and Pictorial Material

 

AR/49 History of the Archive

 

AR/50 Miscellaneous

 

References Used in the Catalogue

 

Throughout the catalogue editorial comment is enclosed in square brackets [...].

 

Dates: 1200 x 1240 means 'at some point between 1200 and 1240'

 

[Public Record Office] Catalogue of Ancient Deeds, 6 vols. [Vols 1, 2 and 5 are in the Royal Institution of Cornwall, 3, 4 and 6 in the Cornwall Record Office].

 

Assize Roll; usually unprinted, pro Just 1/...; but the 1201 one is edited by Lady Stenton, Selden Society vol. 68, and the Devon Assize Roll 1238 is edited by Summerson (Devon and Cornwall Record Society 1985).

 

F. Barlow, Episcopal Acta.

 

The Book of Fees or Testa de Nevill.

 

Bodrugan Cartulary: Cornwall Record Office ME/595; numbers of charters within it taken from Henderson's transcript (photocopy, Cornwall Record Office ME/596).

 

Bowles: Charles Bowles, A Short Account of the Hundred of Penwith in the County of Cornwall, Sherborne 1805 (photocopy in Royal Institution of Cornwall).

 

Brant.: Register of Bishop Brantingham, 1370-94.

 

Bronesc.: Register of Bishop Bronescombe, 1258-80 (includes also materials for Briwere, 1224-44, Quinel, 1280-91, and Bitton, 1292-1307).

 

Caption: The Caption of Seisin of the Duchy of Cornwall (1337), edited by P.L. Hull (Devon and Cornwall Record Society 1971).

 

Ch.R. or Charter Rolls: Calender of Charter Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office (1903, etc.).

 

Close: Calendar of Close Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office (1892, etc.).

 

Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries.

 

N. Denholm-Young, Richard of Cornwall (Oxford, 1947).

 

E. Ekwall, Dictionary of English Place-Names (4th edition, Oxford 1960).

 

Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources, edited by R. Latham.

 

Earldom Accts: Ministers' Accounts of the Earldom of Cornwall 1296-1297, edited by L. Margaret Midgley, Camden Society, 3rd series, 66-67 (London, 1942-45).

 

Faegersten: Anton Faegersten, The Place-Names of Dorset (Uppsala, 1933).

 

Feet of Fines (Cornwall, 2 vols, to 1461; Devon, 2 vols)

 

The Heads of Religious Houses England and Wales 940-1216, edited by D. Knowles, C.N.L. Brooke and V. London (Cambridge University Press, 1972).

 

Charles Henderson, A History of the Parish of constantine in Cornwall, edited by G.H. Doble (Truro, 1937).

 

Charles Henderson, Essays in Cornish History, edited by A.L. Rowse and M.I. Henderson (Oxford, 1937).

 

Charles Henderson, St Columb Major Church and Parish (Long Compton, n.d. [c.1930]).

 

The Hylle Cartulary, edited by R.W. Dunning (Somerset Record Society, 68, 1968).

 

Calendar of Inquisitions Miscellaneous Preserved in the Public Record Office (1916, etc.).

 

Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem Preserved in the Public Record Office (1906, etc.).

 

LC: Launceston Carturlary, edited by P.L. Hull (Devon and Cornwall Record Society, 1987).

 

LP: Letters and Papers of Henry VIII.

 

Lay Subsidy Roll (Cornwall, 1327 = Public Record Office E. 179/87/7 + 37; Devon, 1332 = edited by Audrey Erskine, Devon and Cornwall Record Society, 1969; Dorset, 1327 = The Dorset Lay Subsidy Roll of 1327, edited by Alexander R. Rumble, Dorset Record Society, vol 6 [Dorchester, 1980]; Dorset, 1332 = The Dorset Lay Subsidy Roll of 1332, edited by A.D. Mills, Dorset Record Society, vol 4 [Dorchester, 1971])

 

D. and S. Lysons, Magna Britannia: Cornwall (London, 1814).

 

George Oliver, Monasticon Dioecesis Exonensis (Exeter, 1848), with Additional Supplement (Exeter, 1854).

 

The Parliamentary Survey of the Duchy of Cornwall, edited by Norman J.G. Pounds, 2 vols, Devon and Cornwall Record Society (Exeter, 1982-84).

 

Calendar of Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office (1891, etc.).

 

R. Pearse Chope, The Book of Hartland (Torquay, 1940).

 

Rot. Litt. Claus.: Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum (printed by the Record Commision).

 

Register of Bishop Stafford 1395-1419.

 

Register of Bishop Stapledon, 1308-26.

 

Stoate: various 16th- and 17th-century subsidies, etc., published by Tom Stoate (copies in Cornwall Record Office search-room).

 

Transactions of the Devonshire Association.

 

Sir John Maclean, Parochial and Family History of the Deanery of Trigg Minor, 3 vols (Bodmin, 1868-79).

 

Victoria County History [Dorset and a little of Gloucestershire are the ones mainly of use for understanding the Arundell archive.]

 

The Visitations of Cornwall, edited by Lieutenant-Colonel J.L. Vivian (Exeter, 1887).

 

J.P. Yeatman, The Early Genealogical History of the House of Arundell (London, 1882) [n.b. use with care: many inaccuracies].

Date: 12th Century - 1940
Held by: Cornwall Record Office, not available at The National Archives
Arrangement:

The Arrangement of the Archive

 

The long period of time over which the archive was created, its subsequent travels and its rearrangement in the early nineteenth century resulted in the original sytem in which the documents were kept, if ever there formally was one, being lost. There are indications of past arrangements for parts of the archive, such as bundles of related items and endorsed numbers and letters, but not of any for the whole archive or even its bulk and much material was in complete disorder.

 

The present arrangement is based on the recommended archival arrangement of estate papers, (Journal of the Society of Archivists, Vol 13, No 1, Spring 1992) adapted in the light of information provided by the documents themselves about how the Arundells ran their estate. The aim has been to reflect the history of the Arundells and their lands while also creating an arrangement which will help users of the archive to find what they require.

 

The medieval section of the archive has been catalogued in far more detail than most of the later material, some of the documents being translated or transcribed almost in full. Many of the later leases ( AR/4 and AR/5) and eighteenth century tin and mining records ( AR/14) have also been listed in detail. Much of the later material from miscellaneous boxes has been briefly bundle-listed and so often appears in general sections of the catalogue although more detailed listing in the future may enable some of it to be placed under individual manors.

 

Several sections of the archive ( AR/1, AR/2, AR/3, AR/4 and AR/5) are organised by manor. In these cases the manors are arranged, within each county, in the order of their acquisition by the Arundells (See The Arundell Estate above).

Language: English
Extent: 9242 files
Custodial history:

The Acquisition and History of the Archive

 

The archive of the Arundell family is one of exceptional richness and is of great national and local importance. It consists of 28,000 documents extending from the twelfth century to the twentieth which record the history of the Arundell family and their land-holdings in Cornwall and several other counties, particularly in the south-west.

 

The archive was in private hands and not widely used by researchers until 1991 when three years of negotiation resulted in its sale by private treaty to the county record offices of Cornwall and Wiltshire. This division of the collection was justified by the exceptional circumstances of its history. The archive comprised the records of two estates, those of the Arundells of Lanherne and those of the Arundells of Wardour, the latter being a junior branch of the family established in Wiltshire in the mid-sixteenth century. In 1739 the Cornish heiress married her distant cousin Henry Arundell, later seventh Baron Arundell of Wardour, and the two estates were jointly inherited by their heir in 1756. The Cornish estates continued to be administered separately from those of the Wardour Arundells, however, and were mostly sold by 1808. As a result the records of the two estates remained distinct and could be divided between the two record offices.

 

In recognition of the archive's national historical interest and because it was to go to publicly funded institutions the sale was exempt from estate duty and received tax concessions. The purchase was made possible by grant donations from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, the Victoria and Albert Museum Purchase Grant Fund, the Wolfson Trust and the Friends of the National Libraries. In Cornwall a generous contribution was made by Cornwall County Council and the remainder was raised by private subscription in an appeal co-ordinated by the Cornwall Heritage Trust.

 

Until 1701, when the last direct male heir died, the main seat of the Arundells in Cornwall was Lanherne manor house in the parish of Mawgan in Pydar. It was from Lanherne that the family's extensive estates were administered and it was in the Lanherne counting-room that the bulk of their records were kept. The heiresses of the last Sir John Arundell were seldom in Cornwall. The administration of the estates was in the hands of a steward based at Lanherne and this arrangement continued after the marriage of Mary Arundell to Henry Arundell in 1739. In 1813 the records of the Cornish Arundells were transferred to Wardour Castle (Journals of Christopher Wallis, Helston attorney, at the Royal Institution of Cornwall.) where a new house and muniment room had been constructed in the late 1770s. Since 1794 Lanherne house had been occupied by a group of Carmelite nuns who were granted sanctuary there by Lord and Lady Arundell after fleeing the French invasion of Antwerp. The documents remained at Wardour until the 1960s when they were moved to a purpose-built muniment room in the grounds of Hook Manor, the family's new home on the Wardour estate. From there they returned to Cornwall in 1991.

 

The original arrangement of the archive was clearly upset during the moves to its various homes over the centuries although a 1757 inventory of the Lanherne counting room suggests that even there it was not kept in any systematic order. The majority of the records fell from active use in the early nineteenth century when the Cornish estates were sold but almost immediately began to be consulted for their historical interest. The History of Modern Wiltshire, published between 1822 and 1844, recorded that Michael Jones esquire, a relative of the ninth Baron's second wife, had minutely examined the documents and arranged them alphabetically and chronologically under each manor (History of Modern Wiltshire, Sir R.C. Hoare, Vol IV part 1, footnote on p. 175). It was probably Jones who wrote comments in the margins and on the dorse of many documents and attached others to backing paper.

 

The Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts first inspected the archive in 1871. The resulting report (Second report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, xi, and appendix, pp.33-36, 1874) recorded that 'the vast collection of Charters, Rolls and Papers are at present deposited in eighteen boxes, in seven presses, and in various drawers. These are filled to overflowing with documents of all dates, from the twelfth century to a comparatively recent period.' The report's author stressed that his visit to Wardour had only been a brief one and recommended more detailed listing at a future date.

 

This more detailed listing was carried out by the Commission in the late 1930s and between 1947 and 1950. Only the medieval and manorial documents were examined and they were transferred into 'archive' storage boxes at this time. The alphabetical and chronological arrangement of the documents in the lists and in the boxes was presumably that imposed by Michael Jones a century earlier. These lists were of limited usefulness as each document was only cursorily described and there were no indexes but they remained the only existing guide to the archive's contents at the time of sale.

 

While the archive was at Wardour Castle and Hook Manor a few scholars were granted access and their work appears in several publications. There are, however, only four known publications containing transcripts of Arundell documents. In 1805 Charles Bowles, A Short Account of the Hundred of Penwith in the County of Cornwall, printed a few very important documents, most of which are no longer in the archive, in A Short Account of the Hundred of Penwith in the County of Cornwall (Charles Bowles, A Short Account of the Hundred of Penwith in the County of Cornwall, A Short Account of the Hundred of Penwith in the County of Cornwall (Sherborne, 1805). The Monasticon Dioecesis Exoniensis of George Oliver, published in 1846 (See also the Additional Supplement to the George Oliver, Monasticon Dioecesis Exoniensis, published in 1854, which contains more transcipts of Tywardreath documents) contains transcripts of several of the Tywardreath documents, some of which are now missing from the archive. In 1876 translations of five manorial accounts which had somehow left the archive were printed in the Journal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall (George Freeth, 'On some extracts from the Ministers Accounts, relating to the Arundell Estates in Cornwall' in Journal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall, 18 (1876), pp.285-93.) The recently published Household Accounts from Medieval England by C.M. Woolgar includes a transcript of a Dinham account (Household Accounts from Medieval England, C.M. Woolgar, Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1992-93.). Many historians of Cornwall and the south-west, however, such as Charles Henderson, Richard Pearse Chope, The Book of Hartland and A.L. Rowse, wrote their works without having studied the Arundell archive.

 

There is also no evidence that N. Denholm-Young, Richard of Cornwall used the documents for his work Richard of Cornwall which makes no reference to the archive, even in the author's own copy of the book which contains annotations made some years after publication.

Administrative History:

The Arundell Family

 

A.L. Rowse described the Arundells as 'the richest and best-beloved of all Cornish families' (Tudor Cornwall, p. 16.) in Tudor times. From small beginnings in the early 1200s, when their only possession was the manor of Treloy in St Columb Major parish, they reached the height of their wealth and influence in the late sixteenth century with twenty-eight manors in Cornwall as well as manors and other properties in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire, the greatest extent of their land-holdings.

 

The earliest record of an Arundell in Cornwall is in 1131 in the Pipe Roll but no connection can be demonstrated between that individual and the later Arundells of Lanherne. An Arundell occurs in Dorset and Somerset in Domesday Book and there are also instances of the name in Devon in the Middle Ages but again there is no evidence to link these people with the Cornish Arundells. The Devonshire manors of Morchard Arundell and Uton Arundell received their affixes from their ownership by the Cornish family.

 

The Arundells extended their land-holdings and rose to prominence through a series of good marriages to wealthy heiresses. Some of their property was purchased but the majority was acquired in this way from the mid-thirteenth century to the late 1500s. Between these dates the Arundells were active locally and nationally. Ralph Arundell was sheriff of Cornwall in 1259-60 and John Arundell became Bishop of Exeter in 1502. Sir John Arundell fought for Henry VI at the Battle of Tewkesbury in 1471 and his grandson was one of those appointed to put down the Cornish rebellion of 1497-8. Two Arundells served as stewards of the Duchy of Cornwall in the sixteenth century and Arundells led Royalist troops during the Civil War. Branches of the family were established at Trerice and Tolverne by younger sons in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The influence of the Arundells declined after the Reformation, when their staunch adherence to Catholicism made them ineligible for public office, but they remained prominent in Cornwall as long as they retained their lands there.

 

The direct male line of the family died out in 1701, the estates being inherited by an heiress and then in 1739 passing to the Wardour Arundells on the marriage of Mary Arundell to her distant cousin Henry Arundell, later seventh Baron of Wardour. From the late seventeenth century the family had ceased to live permanently in Cornwall and when financial problems struck the Cornish estates were at first heavily mortgaged and then, in the late 18th century, began to be sold.

 

The following is an account of the direct descent of the family, noting the additions of land to the estate. The evidence for the 14th century is not very clear and there may have been another John Arundell at that time.

 

Remfrey Arundell I; floruit 1230-50; in possession of Treloy manor in circa 1230; possibly married to Maud.

 

Ralph Arundell son of Remfrey; sheriff in 1259-60; took possession of Restormel Castle on behalf of Thomas de Tracy in July 1265; married Eve de la Roche in 1242 x 1245 and was given Trembleath manor by Eve's father Sir Richard de la Roche (Rupe) in circa 1255 [Trembleath became the family's principal residence in the later thirteenth and the fourteenth centuries]; purchased Mitchell manor in circa 1270; died Aug 1275 x Feb 1276.

 

Remfrey Arundell II son of Ralph [?; the sole evidence that he was Ralph's son is that Odo his brother and executor in 1281 was son of Eve]; married in 1265 x 1268 Alice de Lanhern the heiress to Connerton manor, the Hundred of Penwith, Lanherne manor, land in St Columb Major and, in Devon, the manors of Morchard Arundell and Uton Arundell; died 1278 x 1281. Alice remarried in 1285-6 to John de Umfraville and consequently Alice's inheritance did not revert to the Arundells until after her death, in 1302 x 1311, and that of her second husband, in 1311 x 1322.

 

John Arundell I son of Remfrey II; asserted his title to a market and fair at Mitchell in 1302 (Quo Warranto, p.109b); married Joan, daughter and heiress of Ralph le Soor (this marriage resulted in the Arundells acquiring the manors of Prospidnick and Tolverne in the early 15th century); died 1306 x 1309.

 

John Arundell II son of John I; inherited lands of Alice de Lanherne in 1311 x 1322; knighted by July 1334; died ?

 

John Arundell III son of John II; born not before 1288; in 1334 married Elizabeth Carminow (this marriage resulted in the Arundells acquiring the Carminow inheritance over sixty years later); knighted by 1371; married Isabel daughter of Sir Thomas de Molton by 1371; died Oct 1374 x Feb 1376.

 

John Arundell IV son of John III ?; known as Sir John Arundell of Treloy; married Joan Luscott in 1362 x 1367 which brought to the Arundells (after the deaths of Joan and her second husband Sir William Lambourn in 1397 x 1407) the Devonshire manors of Battishorne, Darracott, Gratton, Loddiswell, Ideford, and Spreacombe and land in Buckland Dinham and Luscott; died 1372 x 1376, predeceasing his father.

 

John Arundell V son of John IV (his elder brother Ralph died a minor in 1382-3); born circa 1366; inherited manors of Carminow, Kennall and Winnington and advowsons of Philleigh and Whitstone in 1396 as a result of his grandfather's marriage in 1334; knighted in 1399; by 1407 had inherited property in Devon from his mother Joan Luscott; served in navy 1418-19; married Annora Lambourn which brought to the Arundells the manors of Goran, Lambourn, Lanhadron, Penwerris and Tregarne Condurrow; died 11th January 1435.

 

John Arundell VI son of John Arundell 'of Bideford' who died circa 1424 and grandson of John V; born circa 1421; married by April 1446 to Elizabeth daughter of Thomas, Earl of Morley; married in 1451 Katherine Chideock, the widow of William Stafford, which brought to the family (after death without issue in 1469 of Katherine's son Humphrey Stafford) extensive lands in Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire; knighted between December 1464 and November 1465; had purchased lands in Carvedras held of Newham manor by 1467 68; purchased Perlees manor in circa 1470; fought for King Henry VI at the Battle of Tewkesbury in May 1471; died between July 1471 and December 1473.

 

Thomas Arundell son of John VI; born circa 1452; married in 1473 Katherine Dinham which brought to the Arundells in 1501 (on the death of Katherine's brother John, Lord Dinham) a quarter-share in the Cornish manors of Bodardle, Cardinham, Downinney and Gurlyn as well as in manors in Devon, Somerset, Oxfordshire and elsewhere; knighted in 1483; attainted in 1484 for rebelling against King Richard III; died 1st October 1485.

 

John Arundell VII son of Thomas Arundell; born circa 1474; appointed to put down Cornish revolt of 1497; acquired Dinham inheritance in 1501; knighted by 1501; married Elizabeth daughter of Thomas Grey, Marquis of Dorset, who died between February 1502 and December 1503 [AR/20/36 and AR/27/4]; in 1506 married Katherine Graynfeld; his son Thomas (died 1552) purchased Wardour Castle in Wiltshire and founded a junior branch of the family there; died 8th February 1545.

 

John Arundell VIII son of John VII; born circa 1500; married Elizabeth Danet in 1525; died 7th November 1557.

 

John Arundell IX son of John VIII; born circa 1530; married, by August 1560, Ann, widow of Charles Lord Stourton and daughter of Thomas Stanley, Earl of Derby; knighted between 1565 and 1567; in December 1575 purchased from the Earl of Oxford the Cornish manors of Bejowan, Domellick, Roseworthy, Tregenna, Tregorrick and Tresithney; in 1587 purchased the manor of Newland Preeze; died 17th November 1590.

 

John Arundell X son of John IX; born circa 1563; not knighted; in 1587 married Ann Jernegan; died 22 July 1633.

 

John Arundell XI son of John X; born post 1591; married Elizabeth Brock; died 1642.

 

John Arundell XII son of John XI; born circa 1623; knighted between 1642 and 1671; married firstly Elizabeth Roper, daughter of Lord Teynham, and then Anna Arundell of Trerice (by 1679: AR/25/36); died 13 October 1701.

 

Frances Arundell daughter of John XII and Elizabeth Roper; born 1651; in 1671 married Sir Richard Bellings (died 30 October 1716); died 1714.

 

Richard Bellings Arundell son of Frances and Richard Bellings (his elder brother Charles died in 1710); born ?; took Arundell as his surname in accordance with his grandfather's will (AR/21/42/1); in 1704 married Ann Gage (died 25 August 1718); died February 1725.

 

Frances Arundell daughter of Richard Bellings Arundell; born circa 1704; in 1733 married Sir John Gifford (died 1736); no children; died 8 February 1752.

 

Mary Arundell sister of Frances and daughter of Richard Bellings Arundell; born ? [a minor at time of her father's death]; in 1739 married Henry Arundell, later the seventh Lord Arundell of Wardour (1717 - 1756); died 1769.

 

Henry, eighth Lord Arundell of Wardour, son of Mary and Henry Arundell; born 1740; married Mary Conquest; inherited Lanherne estates from his mother and Wardour estates from his father; died 1808.

 

Arundell family tree available at Cornwall Record Office

 

Families Connected with the Arundells

 

Arches

 

See under Dinham.

 

Arundell of Trerice

 

This was a junior branch of the Arundells of Lanherne which appears to have been established in the fourteenth century, probably by a younger son. According to Carew's Survey of Cornwall a Ralph Arundell married Jane/Joan, the daughter of Michael Trerise, during the reign of Edward III. Compare Public Record Office JUST I/1476, mem.73 dorse, July 1367 in which the defendants include Ralph Arundell of Treres and Joan his wife. AR/1/104 is a grant from Sir John Arundell to Ralph Arundell of Trerys in 1358. This Ralph died between July and November 1369 (AR/1/241; AR/32/1 and AR/1/846), and had at least two sons, Nicholas (AR/41/6) and Thomas (AR/41/5), and a daughter Joan (AR/32/1). There is no record of the split in the Lanherne archive and unfortunately the archive of the Arundells of Trerice has disappeared virtually without trace.

 

In 1664 Richard Arundell was created Baron Arundell of Trerice. The title became extinct in 1773 on the death without issue of his great-grandson John.

 

John Arundell XII married Anna/Anne Arundell of Trerice as his second wife. She had previously been married to a Trevanion and AR/17/118-125 concern provision made for her children by this marriage.

 

Bellings

 

In 1671 Frances Arundell, the daughter and heiress of the last Sir John Arundell, married Sir Richard Bellings, son of the Irish historian Richard Bellings. They had at least four children: Charles who died in 1710, Richard who became the heir and assumed the name Arundell in accordance with his grandfather's will (he is usually referred to as Richard Bellings Arundell), John who survived Richard and married Mary Compton, and Mary who became Lady Hales. Lady Frances Bellings died in 1714 and Sir Richard in 1716.

 

The estates of the Bellings included much land in Ireland and there is correspondence in the archive relating to this. Sir Richard was Comptroller of the Household of Queen Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, apparently from the time of her marriage in 1662 until her death in 1705. In October 1662 he went to Rome to deliver letters to the Pope and leading cardinals concerning the condition of Portugal. The archive contains records of this office.

 

Bere

 

The Bere family lived in St Ervan and two members, George Bere senior and junior, served consecutively as steward of the Arundell estates in Cornwall in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. It is unclear at what date George Bere junior succeeded his father. He had probably done so by 1698 at which date George Bere senior was still alive as his son is referred to as 'the younger' (AR/34/7). George Bere junior died in 1720 (AR/34/12; cf. AR/50/11) having served four generations of the Arundells. The bulk of the estate correspondence from the late 1600s until 1720 is either to or from him. This estate correspondence, includes letters to and from other members of the Bere family in London and Devon (See note to AR/10 under The Arrangement of the Archive).

 

Trerovell in St Ervan came into the hands of the Bere family as early as 1284 (Cornwall Feet of Fines, I, no. 289; AR/1/951) and the Trerovell deeds in the archive (AR/1/949 - 960) seem to be present because of the 17th - 18th century connection between the Beres and the Arundells. There is no evidence that Trerovell was ever an Arundell property. Similarly there are several 18th century documents about lands in Newlyn in Paul, often connected with the Beres, although there are also instances of the Arundells receiving rent from these properties. It is possible that the Arundells bought these tenements from the Beres or administered them on their behalf for a short while.

 

Cardinham

 

See under Dinham.

 

Carminow

 

On 21st February 1396 the heiress Joan Carminow died, a minor aged 10 or 11 (Cal. Ipms, XVII, 241-42, no. 615). She was the last of the main line of the Carminows although junior branches of the family continued through until at least the mid-seventeenth century. As a result of her death the Carminow estates were split between the Arundells of Lanherne and the Trevarthians of Trevarthian in St Hilary. The archive contains two copies of the deed dividing the estates, a calendar-entry of which is also in print (AR/1/192; Public Record Office Catalogue of Ancient Deeds IV, A. 10409). In the case of the Arundells this occurred as a result of a marriage more than 60 years earlier between Elizabeth de Carminow (sister of Joan's great-grandfather Roger de Carminow) and John Arundell III (grandfather of John Arundell V who inherited the lands in 1396); in John Trevarthian's case, his father had married Maud, sister to Elizabeth and Roger.

 

Chideock

 

In 1451 John Arundell VI married, as his second wife, Katherine Chideock of Chideock in Dorset. She and her sister Margaret were coheiresses of their father John Chideock who died in 1444 x 1450. Katherine's first marriage, to William Stafford, had produced a son, Humphrey, who would have expected to inherit her lands. Humphrey was created earl of Devon by King Edward IV in 1469 (and so was on the opposing side to the Arundells in the Wars of the Roses, for they were Lancastrians) and died three months later without issue. The Arundells thus acquired Katherine's inheritance of estates in Dorset, Somerset, Wiltshire and Gloucestershire (See AR/2/1229). Katherine died in 1478 x 1480.

 

Dinham

 

In about 1473 Thomas Arundell married Katherine Dinham, sister of John Lord Dinham. The Dinhams were very prominent and wealthy in Devon, with extensive lands in the south-west and further afield, although Thomas Arundell cannot have expected to inherit much, if anything, as Katherine was one of nine children. Remarkably, all four brothers died without living issue, John Lord Dinham himself being the last in January 1501, and the Dinham estates were inherited by the four surviving sisters or their heirs. In addition to Sir John Arundell, son and heir of Katherine and Thomas Arundell, these were: Margery, wife of Sir Edmund Carew of Mohun's Ottery, son and heir of Nicholas, Baron Carew; Elizabeth Lady Fitzwarin, later to marry Sir Thomas Brandon as her third husband; and Joan Lady Zouche, wife of John Lord Zouche.

 

The Dinham lands were not split between the four coheirs but continued to be run as a single estate, known as 'Dinham's Lands', with the yearly revenue being divided. This arrangement was still in operation in 1566 when a survey of the lands was drawn up for Henry Compton, by then one of the coheirs (Devon Record Office, Z17/3/19; microfilm no. MFC 70/1-7; copy of the microfilm in Cornwall Record Office, FS 4/1).

 

In addition to their share in the estate the Arundells seem to have acquired a considerable proportion of the Dinham family archive. The history of the Dinham family went back to the first half of the twelfth century in Devon and well before that in Brittany. It is well treated by Michael Jones, The Family of Dinan in England in the Middle Ages: La famille de Dinan en Angleterre au Moyen Age (Dinan, 1987), but three of their acquisitions and kindred families will be briefly noted here since documents connected with them appear in the archive.

 

(a) In 1268 the great Cornish heiress Isolda de Cardinan set about giving away her lands, presumably in the knowledge that she would die without heirs, and settled upon three main beneficiaries. Henry Champernowne received some estates, primarily Ludgvan and the secular manor of Tywardreath (AR/37/2), Richard Earl of Cornwall's portion included Restormel Castle and the Dinhams acquired the manors of Bodardle, Cardinham and Downinney. The Dinhams also received a few deeds concerning Tywardreath Priory which had been granted much property by Isolda's family. The reasons for Isolda's choice of beneficiaries are unknown: there is no evidence for any kinship between the Cardinhams and Dinhams, both of which had existed independently long before the bequest.

 

(b) Joyce de Dinham (died 1301) married, before April 1292, Margaret de Hydon who brought to the Dinhams the manors of Clayhidon and Hemyock in Devon. Joyce de Dinham died aged only 28 and his widow remarried, first to Sir Gilbert de Knoville, who died before 1313 (AR/1/876), and then to Peter de Uvedale (AR/1/548). Margaret was widowed for the third time by May 1337 but lived to May 1357 still using the Dinham seal (eg. AR/1/639).

 

Margaret de Hydon acquired from her second husband, Gilbert de Knoville, a life interest in the Devonshire manors of Battishorne, Ideford and Loddiswell, manors which the Arundells later inherited from the Luscotts (Joan Luscott was a coheir of Gilbert de Knoville). Some deeds connected with these properties probably entered the archive through the Dinhams in 1501 rather than through the Luscotts in circa 1400 (AR/1/548 concerns Battishorne; AR/1/553 was executed at Loddiswell and AR/1/1038-9 at Ideford).

 

(c) John Dinham (c.1406-58), father of the nine men and women who formed the last generation of the Dinhams, married Joan Arches of Oxfordshire. She outlived her husband by nearly forty years, dying in 1497, only four years before her last son, John Lord Dinham. Joan brought to the family lands in Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, a share in which later came from the Dinhams to the Arundells, although they do not seem to have been reckoned part of 'Dinham's lands' and do not appear in the 1566 survey. The Dinhams had already possessed lands in those areas from at least the fourteenth century. The Arundells retained an interest in some of these places although their quarter-shares in others were sold in a tidy-up of the estates in 1576 (AR/1/711, AR/1/713-717, AR/1/837-838).

 

Fitzpayne

 

Isabella, daughter of Robert Fitzpayne (or 'son of Pagan'), married Sir John Chideock (died 1365-66) and thus brought the Fitzpayne lands and documents to the Chideock family and thence to the Arundells. The 'de Wudetune' family, who also appear in the archive, were ancestors of the Fitzpaynes.

 

Fitzwaryn

 

There are two possible sources for documents about the Fitzwaryn family in the archive. Sir John Chideock (died 1415-16) married Eleanor Fitzwaryn (AR/39/2), and the Fitzwaryns had connections with various Chideock lands in Somerset and perhaps Dorset in the 14th century. In the fifteenth century one of the Dinham coheirs, Elizabeth (died 1516), had married Fouke Bourchier, Lord Fitzwaryn (died 1479), as one of her husbands. Therefore documents referring to the Fitzwaryn family could have entered the archive via the Chideocks or via the Dinhams.

 

Gifford

 

In 1733 Frances Arundell, eldest daughter of Richard Bellings Arundell, married Sir John Gifford of Burstall in Leicestershire. They had no children; Sir John died in 1736 and Lady Frances in 1752. The Gifford estate included lands in Leicestershire, Cambridgeshire, Kent, Essex and possibly in Italy, much of which was bequeathed to Sir John's sister, Mary Anne Gifford.

 

Hydon

 

See under Dinham.

 

Lambourn

 

The connections between the Arundells and the Lambourn family are somewhat involved. Sir William Lambourn first married Joan Lanhadron (by October 1374, AR/1/261) and then married Joan Luscott, widow of Sir John Arundell IV (died 1376), by July 1394 (AR/17/1-2). His daughter by his first wife, Annora Lambourn, married John Arundell V and brought to the Arundells the Lambourn and Lanhadron lands. Sir William Lambourn was still alive in 1398 (AR/4/312).

 

Lanhadron

 

The Lanhadron heiress Joan, daughter of John Lanhadron and his wife Amity, married William Lambourn (See Lambourn above). Their daughter Annora married John Arundell V and brought to the Arundells the manors of Lanhadron and Goran inherited from her mother. Joan Lanhadron may have died by July 1391 and had certainly done so by July 1394.

 

Lanherne

 

In 1265 x 1268 Remfrey Arundell II married Alice, daughter and coheiress of John de Lanhern who had died by November 1256 (It is unclear what happened to Alice's sister Margery). Alice inherited from her father Lanherne manor and probably the Devon manors of Morchard [Arundell] and Uton [Arundell], all held of the Bishop of Exeter, and from her mother Margery Pincerna (See Pincerna below) the manor of Connerton and Hundred of Penwith. Remfrey had died by 1281 and Alice married in 1284 x 1286 John de Umfraville of Devon, retaining her inheritance. It was not until after the deaths of Alice (between 1302 and 1311) and John de Umfraville (between 1311 and 1322) that these lands reverted to the Arundells.

 

Luscott

 

Sir John Arundell IV married before November 1367 Joan Luscott (born July 1353), the daughter of William Luscott and his first wife, Alice. They had at least two sons, the second one, John, eventually becoming the heir (Cal.Ipms, XVI, no. 507). Joan brought with her lands in Devon including the manors of Battishorne, Ideford and Loddiswell. She was apparently one of three coheiresses and there were later lawsuits to sort out the estates (AR/16/7, 17/70, 17/72-73, 41/10).

 

After John Arundell IV died, predeceasing his father, Joan remained in possession of her inheritance, residing at Lanherne and Loddiswell. Both her sons were still minors. By July 1394 Joan was remarried, to Sir William Lambourn (See Lambourn above), taking her inheritance with her and it was not until after the deaths of Joan and Sir William (after 1398 and before September 1407, and possibly before 1401; AR/4/312, AR/20/16-17 and AR/17/70) that the lands reverted to Joan's son, John Arundell V.

 

Pincerna

 

In circa 1240 Margery Pincerna married John de Lanhern (See Lanherne above) bringing with her Welcombe in Devon as a gift from her father, Richard. She later inherited from him the manor of Connerton and Hundred of Penwith which her daughter Alice took on marriage to the Arundells. Margery was still alive in August 1260 (Register of Bishop Bronescombe, 52 and 162).

 

Roche

 

In 1242 x 1245 Ralph Arundell married Eve de la Roche (or 'de Rupe'), daughter of Richard and Agnes de la Roche, and in circa 1255 they were granted the manors of Trembleath and Tredrizzick by Eve's father. Richard de la Roche was still alive in 1262 (Feet of Fines 183) and his widow Agnes was still alive in 1283 (AR/45).

 

Robert de la Roche, son and heir of Richard and brother of Eve, was knighted between 1262 and 1283 (AR/1/72 and AR/45) and was still alive in circa 1300 (AR/1/100).

 

The Roche family is sometimes called Tremoddrett, from their residence at Tremoddrett in Roche parish.

 

Soor

 

According to The Visitations of Cornwall, edited by Lieutenant-Colonel J. L. Vivian (The Visitations of Cornwall, p.2) John Arundell I married Joan, daughter of Ralph le Soor, in circa 1290. As a result of this marriage the Arundells inherited the manors of Prospidnick and Tolverne after the death of Ralph Soor in 1409 x 1417. Bodwannick was also a Soor manor but seems to have gone to the Colyns family before being acquired by the Arundells by the year 1464.

 

Stourton

 

The Arundells had two connections with the Stourtons. In the 15th century Margaret Chideock, the sister and coheir of the Katherine Chideock who married John Arundell VI, married Sir William Stourton. In the 16th century Sir John Arundell IX married (by August 1560) Ann, the daughter of Thomas Stanley, Earl of Derby, and the widow of Charles Lord Stourton who was executed in 1557.

 

The Arundell Estate

 

At its greatest extent the Arundell estate contained areas of land scattered throughout Cornwall but was particularly strong in the centre and west of the county. The tenements of the earliest holdings, the manors of Treloy and Trembleath, were concentrated in the parishes along the central northern coast and the Arundell presence in this area was strengthened by the acquisition of Mitchell, Lanherne and St Columb. The inheritance of Connerton manor and the Hundred of Penwith, the only Cornish hundred in private hands, brought pre-eminent influence in the west of the county. The Carminow inheritance delivered to the Arundells property in areas which were to become important for tin-mining. Influence in the south and centre of the county was increased by the Lambourn and Dinham inheritances and confirmed by the purchase of the Earl of Oxford manors and of Newland Preeze. Mitchell was the only Cornish borough held by the Arundells; St Columb never obtained formal borough status although it had many of the attributes of a medieval borough and is sometimes so termed.

 

The Arundell property in Devon was concentrated in the east of the county and the north-west, with the isolated manors of Loddiswell and Langford Lester in the south west and Dunterton on the border with Cornwall. As part of their Dinham inheritance the Arundells held a quarter share in the manor, borough and hundred of Hartland.

 

The eighteen Dorset manors, all inherited from the Chideocks, were in the east and north of the county apart from Winterbourne Houghton in the centre. The manor of Chideock became the second seat of the Arundell family after Lanherne.

 

In Somerset the Arundell manors were in the south except for Buckland Dinham in the west. The family also owned manors, or shares in manors, in Buckinghamshire, Gloucestershire, Leicestershire, Oxfordshire, Surrey, Warwickshire and Wiltshire.

 

The following notes give for each manor: the dates when acquired by the Arundells and when sold by them; the parishes where the manorial centre and other tenements were located; any points of note about the manor and individual tenements, particularly those acquired or lost at a different date from the main manor. The manors are listed by county in the order of their acquisition by the Arundells.

 

Cornwall

 

Manor of Treloy: appears in possession of Arundells in early thirteenth century, held indirectly of Bodmin Priory to which it had belonged since before 1066. Tenements sold off piecemeal in late 18th century.

 

Manorial centre was in St Columb Minor; tenements also in St Allen, St Columb Major, Crantock, Cuby, Kea, Kenwyn, Mawgan in Pydar, St Minver and Perranzabuloe.

 

The manorial affiliation of Bohago in Cuby is unclear and it has been placed under Treloy because of its close association with Gargas in Cuby which was a free tenement of Treloy.

 

Penpoll in Crantock was a initially a sub-manor of Treloy, having its own manorial account in the 1390s, but was later treated as a tenement of Treloy. In the catalogue Penpoll's tenements of Mingham and Treviglas have been treated as tenements of Treloy.

 

Penryn in St Gluvias was partly acquired by gift in 1412 and partly through the Lambourn inheritance in circa 1435.

 

Treglyn (or possibly Treglines) in St Minver was acquired by gift of Roger de Trewelwart in circa 1260 and held of Blisland manor as a tenement of Treloy.

 

Trelease in Kea was acquired in 1501 and held of Treloy from the late sixteenth century.

 

Treninnick in St Columb Minor was acquired in circa 1255 and held as a free tenement of Treloy although one document shows it being held of Lanherne manor (AR/1/111).

 

Treworder in Kenwyn was granted to the Arundells by Richard Nevill in 1467 and held as a free tenement of Treloy.

 

Manor of Trembleath: given to the Arundells in circa 1255 by Sir Richard de Roche following the marriage of his daughter Eve to Ralph Arundell. Some tenements sold in late 18th century; remainder of manor sold to Francis Cross of Crediton, Devon, in early 19th century. Trembleath was the principal residence of the Arundells in the later thirteenth and fourteenth centuries until they moved to Lanherne.

 

Manorial centre was in St Ervan; tenements also in St Columb Minor, Crantock, Egloshayle, St Eval, St Kew, St Merryn, St Minver and Roche.

 

A tenement in St Ervan churchtown was purchased from John Corffe in 1597 and held as a tenement of Trembleath.

 

The manor of Lemail in Egloshayle was acquired in Circa 1260 by grant from Gilbert de Foresta and held as a free tenement of Trembleath. Tredrizzick in St Minver, which was given to the Arundells at the same time as Trembleath, was initially called a manor although later found as a free tenement of Trembleath.

 

Manor of Mitchell: purchased from Peter de Ralegh in circa 1270; sold in March 1775 to the Scawens of Carshalton, Surrey. In 1239 Mitchell had been granted a yearly fair and weekly market by royal charter and by 1305 it was being termed a borough (burgus). In 1552 Mitchell acquired parliamentary representation. There are Mitchell documents dating from the 13th century to 1641 at Gloucestershire Record Office: D.421/A2/1-25.

 

Manorial centre was in St Enoder; tenements also in Newlyn East.

 

Manor of Connerton and the Hundred of Penwith: came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1320 as a result of the marriage of Remfrey Arundell to Alice de Lanherne in circa 1268. Alice had inherited Connerton and Penwith from her mother Margaret Pincerna and they reverted to the Arundell line after the deaths of Alice and her second husband John Umfraville. Sold in 1813 to Sir Christopher Hawkins.

 

Manorial centre was in Gwithian; tenements also in Crowan, Gulval, Gwinear, St Ives, Lelant, Phillack and Welcombe parish in Devon. Lordship of the Hundred of Penwith (the only Cornish hundred in private hands) gave the Arundells the rights to try certain cases of trespass, trespass on the law, debt and detinue, to appoint a jailor for the detention of persons apprehended, to receive high-rent from the lords of the principal manors and to claim the regalia of the navigable rivers and havens, the profits of the royal gold and silver mines, and all wrecks, escheats, deodands, treasure trove, waifs, estrays, goods of felons and droits of admiralty happening within the hundred.

 

Penpoll in Phillack was a sub-manor of Connerton and had its own accounts for one year. It was occasionally termed a manor and its tenements included Hendra and Rinsey in Breage.

 

Land at Welcombe in Hartland hundred, Devon, had been granted to Margaret Pincerna at her marriage to John de Lanherne in circa 1240. This holding was later held of Connerton manor, anomalously but for understandable reasons.

 

Manor of Lanherne: came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1320 as a result of the marriage of Remfrey Arundell to Alice de Lanherne in circa 1268 (See Manor of Connerton above). Tenements sold off piecemeal from mid 17th century and manor sold in 1803 but Lanherne mansion house granted to Carmelite nuns in 1794 and some tenements still owned by Arundells at very end of 19th century.

 

Manorial centre in St Mawgan in Pydar; tenements also in St Columb Major, St Columb Minor and St Eval.

 

Land at Carlogas and Gilton was purchased from John Hawkyn in 1586 and held of the royal manor of Carnanton.

 

Land near Carnanton Mill was acquired in 1581 from William Kellway and a tenement of Carnanton manor (a royal manor) was held of Lanherne later in the sixteenth century. These holdings appear to be separate from the farm of Carnanton manor which the Arundells leased in the sixtenth century.

 

Land in St Columb Major was at first reckoned as part of Lanherne Manor until St Columb became a manor in its own right in the mid 14th century. Even after St Columb was termed a manor, however, there are instances of tenements in St Columb town being held of Lanherne. Gluvian was purchased from Nicholas Flamanck in 1600.

 

Manor of St Columb: originally reckoned as part of Lanherne manor, first termed a manor in its own right in 1333 although there are still references to the 'manor' of Lanherne and St Columb in the mid 15th century. Sold to Thomas Rawlings of Padstow in circa 1806. The Arundells never obtained formal borough status for St Columb although it had many of the attributes of a medieval borough and is sometimes so termed (eg. AR/2/181 c.8).

 

Manorial centre and all tenements were in St Columb Major, the majority in St Columb town.

 

Manor of Carminow: came into the lordship of the Arundells in 1396 as a result of the marriage in 1334 of John Arundell to Elizabeth Carminow; sold to John Rogers of Penrose in 1801 (Cornwall Record Office, AD 1060/15). Manorial centre was in St Mawgan in Meneage; tenements also in Breage, Constantine, Cury, Gunwalloe, Helston town.

 

The advowsons of the churches of Whitstone and Philleigh were part of the Carminow inheritance and thus glebe land in those places was administered as part of Carminow manor.

 

Treloweth Wood in St Mewan was part of the Carminow inheritance and is often associated with other tenements of Carminow manor although its manorial affiliation, if any, is unclear.

 

Manor of Kennall: came into the lordship of the Arundells in 1396 as part of the Carminow inheritance (See Carminow manor above); sold in 1800 to the Bath brothers and then to the Williams.

 

Manorial centre and all tenements were in Stithians.

 

Manor of Winnington: came into the lordship of the Arundells in 1396 as part of the Carminow inheritance (See Carminow manor above); sold to John Rogers of Penrose in 1801 (Cornwall Record Office, AD 1060/15).

 

Manorial centre was in Gunwalloe; tenements also in Grade and Ruan Major.

 

Manor of Truro Vean: acquired, probably by purchase, by 1407; tenements sold off from 1783 to 1803, Truro Vean itself being bought by Joseph Edwards of Kenwyn (Cornwall Record Office, SHM 526/1, 2).

 

By 1451 Truro Vean was being termed a manor.

 

Manorial centre was in St Clement; tenements also in Kenwyn and Truro town, and possibly St Columb Major.

 

Tregatillian in St Columb Major is listed as a tenement of Truro Vean in 1499 (AR/2/1340) but is also found as a tenement of Perlees and Trevean manors.

 

The Arundells held other land in Truro which was not part of Truro Vean manor (see Carvedras) and in medieval documents the manorial affiliation of some tenements is unclear. There seems to have been some rationalisation of administration in the post-medieval period - Newham Street, which was a conventionary tenement of Treloy manor in 1460 (AR/2/1337/3), was being treated as a tenement of Truro Vean manor by the mid 17th century.

 

Manor of Prospidnick: came into the lordship of the Arundells in 1409 x 1417 as a result of the marriage in the late 13th century of John Arundell I and Joan le Soor; sold in late 18th century to Christopher Wallis.

 

Manorial centre in Sithney; tenements also in Constantine and Helston town.

 

Prospidnick (along with the manors of Bodbrane, Pengwedna and Reperry) was made part of the endowment for the Arundell Chantry established in St Columb Major in 1427 and consequently appears little in the early documentation.

 

Manor of Tolverne: came into the lordship of the Arundells in 1409 x 1417 as part of the Soor inheritance (See Prospidnick manor above); in 1427 Sir John Arundell gave Tolverne to his second son Thomas who founded there the line of the Arundells of Tolverne. Tolverne was attacked by Yorkists in 1474, the Arundells being Lancastrians. The family became impoverished and in 1598 sold Tolverne, moving to Truthall in Sithney. Tolverne has been a farm ever since.

 

Manorial centre in Philleigh; tenements also in St Just in Roseland and Veryan.

 

Manor of Pengwedna: purchased [?] by 1433-4; sold in the late 18th century to ?

 

Manorial centre and all tenements in Breage.

 

Pengwedna (along with the manors of Bodbrane, Prospidnick and Reperry) was made part of the endowment for the Arundell Chantry established in St Columb Major in 1427 and consequently appears little in the early documentation.

 

Manor of Reperry: purchased [?] by 1433-4; sold in late 18th century to E.J. Glynn, esquire.

 

Manorial centre in Lanivet; tenements also in Bodmin town, St Columb Major, St Issey, St Wenn and Withiel.

 

Reperry (along with the manors of Bodbrane, Pengwedna and Prospidnick) was made part of the endowment for the Arundell Chantry established in St Columb Major in 1427 and consequently appears little in the early documentation.

 

Manor of Enniscaven: purchased [?] by 1433-4; sold in the late 18th century/early 19th century to Thomas Rawlings.

 

Manorial centre and all tenements in St Dennis.

 

Manor of Bodbrane: purchased from John Billon [?] by 1433-4 (in the Trelawny deeds, now at the Royal Institution of Cornwall, John Billon of Trethewell appears as lord of Bodbrane in 1398; in 1429 Sir John Arundell made an enfeoffment of Bodbrane tenements to several people including the reversion of a life interest acquired from Billon); sold to Joseph Grigg in late 18th century.

 

Manorial centre in Duloe; tenement also in Menheniot. Bodbrane (along with the manors of Pengwedna, Prospidnick and Reperry) was made part of the endowment for the Arundell Chantry established in St Columb Major in 1427 and consequently appears little in the early documentation.

 

Lands in Bodmin appear to have been held of Bodbrane manor (AR/2/1338/2).

 

Manor of Lambourn: acquired by 1431 through marriage of John Arundell V to Annora Lambourn; given by John Arundell V to his third son Remfrey (Lake) and then lost (together with Tregustick manor, q.v.) from the Arundells to Remfrey's son, Remfrey junior, and his mother Joan Nanfan after a law-suit in 1456-57 (AR/17/75-6, AR/20/21) Manorial centre in Perranzabuloe; tenements also in Redruth and possibly in Gwinear and Sithney.

 

Manor of Lanhadron: acquired by 1431 through marriage of John Arundell V to Annora Lambourn; sold off in parcels in the early 19th century, Lanhadron Barton being bought by the Reverend Henry Hawkins Tremayne in 1801.

 

Manorial centre in St Ewe; tenements also in Creed, Goran and St Mewan and possibly St Ervan.

 

Goran manor was associated with Lanhadron from circa 1290 and became Lanhadron's sub-manor in circa 1380. Goran and its tenements of Cotna, Menagwins and Penhale are treated here as tenements of Lanhadron.

 

Ninnis and Retanning may only have been acquired in 1685 (see AR/4/1444). They seem to have been short-term acquisitions as they do not appear on the 1717 rental (Royal Institution of Cornwall, Brooks 35).

 

Rescassa in Goran was acquired in 1459 from Ralph Tripcunyn in exchange for lands in St Columb Major.

 

Land and woods in Sticker in St Mewan were acquired in 1458 from Ralph Reskimmer. Property in Sticker had been a part of the Carminow estate which was inherited by the Trevarthians.

 

Treloweth manor in St Mewan was acquired in 1459 from Philip Kerow and treated as a tenement of Lanhadron.

 

Trelowith Wood was acquired in 1396 as part of the Carminow inheritance but was often associated with nearby Sticker Wood and came to be treated as a tenement of Lanhadron.

 

Trenouth in St Ervan was probably a late acquisition, as it does not appear in the medieval documents, and its manorial affiliation is unclear. The 1708 draft lease of Trenouth was originally kept with Lanhadron leases and endorsed 'Nansladron' (an alternative name for Lanhadron) in the 1930s doubtless due to confusion of 'Trenowith' with Trelowith in St Mewan.

 

Manor of Tregarne Condurrow: acquired by 1431 through marriage of John Arundell V to Annora Lambourn; sold in 1837 to the Lemon family. Manorial centre in St Keverne and St Anthony in Meneage (merger of the originally separate manors of Tregarne and Condurrow); tenements also in Manaccan and St Martin in Meneage.

 

Manor of Tregustick: lands at Tregustick acquired by 1322 (AR/4/183), held at first not as part of any manor but elevated to manorial status by 1442 (AR/2/888). Tregustick was given by John Arundell to his son Remfrey in 1421 (AR/19/2) and then allotted (together with Lambourn manor, q.v.) to Remfrey's son, Remfrey junior, and his mother Joan Nanfan after a law-suit in 1456-57 (AR/17/75-6, AR/20/21).

 

Manorial centre in Withiel; tenements also in St Wenn.

 

Manor of Bodwannick: acquired by 1464, although how is unclear. Bodwannick had belonged to the Soor family. On the death of the Ralph Soor in 1409 x 1417 it appears to have passed to the Colyns family and from them to the Arundells. Sold to E.J. Glynn, esquire, in the late 18th century.

 

Manorial centre in Lanivet; tenements also in Lanhydrock and possibly Bodmin.

 

Carvedras in Kenwyn (not a manor but lands held of Newham manor): acquired by 1458-9 when accounted separately from Truro Vean (AR/2/904); unclear when lost - last separate account is for 1474-5. These lands could not have been part of Truro Vean manor because that was carved out of Moresk manor in St Clement, not Newham manor based in Kenwyn.

 

Manor of Perlees: purchased between 1470 and 1499; sold to Thomas Rawlings, esquire, of Padstow in late 18th/early 19th century. It seems to be mere coincidence that Ralph Arundell was granted the homage and service of Philip de Penles for one and a half acres in Tregawne in circa 1260.

 

Manorial centre was in St Breock; tenements also in St Columb Major, St Ervan, St Eval, St Issey, St Merryn, Padstow, Little Petherick and possibly Cubert and Withiel.

 

Tregatillian in St Columb Major is listed as a tenement of Truro Vean manor in 1499 (AR/2/1340) but is also associated with Perlees. Its deeds and leases have been placed under Perlees. It is also found as a tenement of Trevean manor (q.v.).

 

Manor of Colquite: perhaps a temporary possession of the Arundells in the 1470s (AR/2/426, AR/2/448). Colquite was in the fee of Cardinham, however, and so the Dinhams may have held it briefly during the minority of an heir and been the source of the Colquite documents in the archive.

 

Manorial centre was in St Mabyn.

 

Manor of Bodardle: a quarter-share acquired by the Arundells in 1501 as a result of the marriage in 1473 of Thomas Arundell to Katherine Dinham (See Dinham family above); sold to the Earls of Radnor by 1687 and thence to the Agar-Robartes of Lanhydrock (See Cornwall Record Office, CL 109 - 115 for later Bodardle records).

 

Manorial centre and tenements were in Lanlivery.

 

Trinity Barton, for which there are accounts, must have been part of this manor.

 

Manor of Cardinham: a quarter-share was acquired by the Arundells in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Bodardle manor above); sold in 1800 to Edmund John Glynn, esquire.

 

Cardinham Fee (the group of manors held of Cardinham) was of extensive jurisdiction with holdings in Cornwall and Devon and the Arundells gradually increased their share in it. The Carews sold their quarter to the Comptons from whence it passed to the Arundells in 1573. Edward Lord Zouch sold his portion in 1577 to William Billing of Cardinham who conveyed it to Sir John Arundell the following year. The Fitzwaryn quarter was later divided between two heiresses and in 1707 one of these portions was purchased by Sir Richard Bellings, husband of Frances Arundell. The Arundells never acquired the final eighth of the estate.

 

Manorial centre was in Cardinham; tenements also in St Erth (in 18th century) and possibly Warleggan.

 

Carnabeggas manor in St Erth and Downinney manor in Warbstow were parts of Cardinham Fee. The Arundells probably never acquired more in these manors than their quarter-shares inherited from the Dinhams and they feature little in the archive. Carnabeggas appears as a tenement of Cardinham manor in the 18th century, probably attached to that manor merely for administrative purposes. Downinney was owned by the Champernownes by 1620 (Lake) and there are records of it in Champernowne hands in 1303, 1306 and 1346 (Feudal Aids, I, pp. 201, 208 and 210).

 

Gurlyn manor in St Erth was part of Cardinham Fee and thus appears held of the Arundells although it does not feature largely in Dinham's lands and may not have belonged to the Dinhams. Its manorial affiliation is unclear: in the 17th century it is described as held of Pengwedna or Prospidnick (AR/3/456).

 

Manor of Bejowan: purchased from the Earl of Oxford in 1575-76; sold in the late 18th century to the Clemmow family ? (Lake) Manorial centre was in St Columb Minor; tenements also in Colan, St Columb Major and St Mawgan in Pydar.

 

Tolcarne in St Mawgan in Pydar is also found as a tenement of Treloy manor.

 

Manor of Domellick: purchased from the Earl of Oxford in 1575-76; sold to Thomas Rawlings in the late 18th/early 19th century. Manorial centre and all tenements were in St Dennis.

 

Manor of Roseworthy: purchased from the Earl of Oxford in 1575-76; sold to William Harris of Rosewarne in 1803.

 

Manorial centre was in Gwinear; tenements also in Crowan, St Erth and Phillack.

 

Manor of Tregenna: purchased from the Earl of Oxford in 1575-76; sold in late 18th century to John Gaved of St Mewan. Sometimes referred to as two manors, Tregenna Wartha and Tregenna Wollas.

 

Manorial centre was in St Ewe; tenements also in St Austell, Cubert, Menheniot, Probus, Veryan and Withiel.

 

Manor of Tregorrick: purchased from the Earl of Oxford in 1575-76; sold to Charles Rashleigh in late 18th century [?]. Manorial centre was in St Austell; tenements also in St Columb Major and St Eval.

 

Rosewastis in St Columb Major is also found as a tenement of Tresithney manor.

 

Trevemedar in St Eval is also found as a tenement of Perlees manor.

 

Manor of Tresithney: purchased from the Earl of Oxford in 1575-76; in 1786 given by dowager Lady Arundell to her daughter Eleanor who married Charles Lord Clifford.

 

Manorial centre was in St Columb Major; tenements also in Colan, Gwennap and Perranzabuloe.

 

Most of the lands of this manor were in Gwennap, where a new place called 'Tresithney' was created, but the manorial centre was Tresithney in St Columb Major.

 

Rosewastis in St Columb Major is also found as a tenement of Tregorrick manor.

 

Trevisker in St Eval (not part of any manor: AR/2/970): purchased in 1582 from John Brewar of St Eval; sold ?. Trevisker was granted to Remfrey Arundell in the 13th century and then apparently lost again as there is no trace of it in the archive in the later Middle Ages.

 

Manor of Newland Preeze: purchased from John Copping in 1587; sold ? Newland Preeze was originally part of Cardinham manor and was granted to Sir James Peverell before 1307-08 (AR/1/462). Manorial centre was in Cardinham; tenements also in Blisland and St Breward.

 

Trevean lands: Trevean manor in St Merryn was NOT owned by the Arundells but they appear to have purchased tenements of that manor in 1596 from Robert Kestell of St Columb Minor (AR/1/521) and in 1598 from the Teage family (AR/1/524). The early deeds of Trevean tenements must have been acquired at this time as specified in the deeds of bargain and sale. The tenements bought were Croftow, Lanhingey, Rosewastis, Tregatillian and Trethewell in St Columb Major.

 

Rosewastis is also found as a tenement of the manors of Carnanton, Tregorrick and Tresithney.

 

Tregatillian is also found as a tenement of the manors of Perlees and Truro Vean.

 

Buckinghamshire

 

Manor of Cuddington: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1562 (AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Cuddington parish.

 

Manor of Little Kimble: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1562 (AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Little Kimble parish.

 

Manor of Oving: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1574 (AR/2/1395).

 

Manorial centre was in Oving parish.

 

Devon

 

Manors of Morchard Arundell and Uton Arundell: apparently came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1320 as a result of the marriage of Remfrey Arundell to Alice de Lanherne in circa 1268 (See Manor of Connerton above); some tenements of Morchard Arundell sold in 1629; Uton Arundell still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre and tenements of Morchard Arundell were in Morchard Bishop parish.

 

Manorial centre of Uton Arundell was in Crediton parish; tenements also in Colebrook parish.

 

The manors acquired their affixes through being owned by the Cornish Arundells.

 

Manor of Battishorne: came into lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as a result of the marriage of John Arundell to Joan Luscott in 1367 and after the deaths of Joan and her second husband (See Luscott family above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1545. Manorial centre was in Honiton parish.

 

'Manor of Braunton': see under manor of Luscott below.

 

Manor of Darracott: probably came into lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393) although it does not appear in John Arundell's I.P.M. of 1435. Manorial centre was in Georgeham parish.

 

Manor of Gratton: probably came into lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above); a 19th century endorsement states that Gratton was settled upon Thomas Arundell [later of Wardour] on his marriage in 1525 (20/39) but it still appears in the possession of the Lanherne Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in High Bray parish.

 

Manor of Ideford: came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of the Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above) and included the advowson of Ideford church; still in possession of the Arundells in 1534.

 

Manorial centre in Ideford parish; tenements also in Ilsington parish.

 

Manor of Loddiswell: came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of the Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above); still in possession of the Lanherne Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393) but by 1695 Loddiswell rectory was being leased by Wardour Arundells (AR/4/2031-2034).

 

Manorial centre was in Loddiswell parish.

 

Manor of Luscott: came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of the Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1605.

 

Manorial centre was in Braunton parish.

 

Luscott may have been held of the manors of Braunton Gorges and Braunton Abbot and there are therefore occasional confusing references to Arundell 'ownership' of the 'manor of Braunton'.

 

Manor of North Buckland: probably came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of the Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in Georgeham parish.

 

Generally called 'Buckland Dinham' but distinguish from Buckland

 

Denham manor in Somerset (See below).

 

Manor of Spreacombe: probably came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1400 as part of the Luscott inheritance (See Manor of Battishorne above); a 19th century endorsement states that it was settled upon Thomas Arundell [later of Wardour] upon his marriage in 1525 but it still appears in the possession of the Lanherne Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in Morthoe parish.

 

Manor of 'Clyston' [?]: a quarter-share presumably acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1632.

 

Manorial centre was in Broad Clyst parish.

 

The main evidence for this manor is a single court roll where it is called 'Clyston' but perhaps it should be identified with Southbrook manor in the same parish (See below).

 

Manor of Clayhidon: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1583 (AR/2/1396).

 

Manorial centre was in Clayhidon parish.

 

Manor of Dunterton: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above) and included the advowson of Dunterton church; still in possession of the Arundells in late 16th century.

 

Manorial centre was in Dunterton parish.

 

Manor of Harpford: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in Harpford parish.

 

Manor of Hartland: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1648.

 

Manorial centre was in Hartland parish; tenements also in the parishes of Hatherleigh and Woolfardisworthy in Devon and Stratton in Cornwall.

 

Ownership of the manor of Hartland went along with ownership of the borough of Hartland ('Harton') and of the hundred of Hartland (Pearse Chope, p.103 and p.44) and there are court rolls for all three.

 

Manor of Hemyock: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above) which included the advowson of Hemyock church; still in possession of the Arundells in 1588.

 

Manorial centre was in Hemyock parish.

 

The manor owned the hundred of Hemyock.

 

Manor of Ilsington: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in Ilsington parish.

 

Manor of Kingskerswell: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in Kingskerswell parish.

 

Manor of Matford: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in late 16th century.

 

Manorial centre was in Exminster parish; tenements also in Alphington parish.

 

Manor of Natsworthy: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1591 (AR/19/57).

 

Manorial centre was in Widdecombe in the Moor parish.

 

Borough of Newton Poppleford: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1591 (AR/19/57).

 

Centre was in Newton Poppleford parish.

 

Manor of Nutwell: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1555 (AR/8/297).

 

Manorial centre was in Woodbury parish.

 

Manor of Offwell: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1562 (AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Offwell parish.

 

Manor of Southbrook: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1588 (AR/19/52).

 

Manorial centre was in Broad Clyst parish.

 

Manor of Venn Ottery: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1665 (AR/10/16).

 

Manorial centre was in Venn Ottery parish.

 

Manor of Whiteheathfield: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1588 (AR/19/51).

 

Manorial centre was in Cullompton parish.

 

Manor of Woodhuish: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1596 (AR/4/2083).

 

Manorial centre was in Brixham parish.

 

Manor of Wrayland: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1609 (AR/2/1393).

 

Manorial centre was in Bovey Tracey parish.

 

Dorset

 

Manor of Atram: acquired in 1469 as a result of the marriage in 1451 of John Arundell to Katherine Chideock (See Chideock family above). May have later become a tenement of Chideock manor (AR/2/1265).

 

Manorial centre was in Symondsbury parish.

 

Manor of Buckhorn Weston: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above).

 

Occurs little in archive. The evidence that the Arundells held the manor and not simply land there is the accounts for 1599 (AR/2/1326).

 

Manorial centre was in Buckhorn Weston parish.

 

Manor of Burcombe: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1536 (AR/2/1268).

 

Manorial centre was in North Poorton parish.

 

Manor of Burton: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1544 (AR/2/826).

 

Manorial centre was in Charminster parish.

 

Manor of Chideock: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); sold in 1802 (AR/1/656) to Humphrey Weld of Lulworth Castle.

 

Manorial centre was in Chideock parish; tenements possibly also in Bothenhampton and Marshwood parishes.

 

Chideock became the main seat of the Arundell family outside Cornwall.

 

Manor of Fifehead Neville: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1588 (AR/19/51).

 

Manorial centre was in Fifehead Neville parish.

 

Manor of Hackeridge: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1775 (AR/1/899).

 

Manorial centre was in Marshwood parish.

 

Originally part of Marshwood manor (See below) but called a manor in its own right by 1317. May have become part of Chideock manor in late 18th century (AR/8/329).

 

Manor of Hydes: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1595 (AR/4/2106).

 

Manorial centre was in Lydlinch parish; possibly a tenement in Stocke parish.

 

Also called Lydlinch manor.

 

Manor of Marshwood [?]: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock (See Manor of Atram above); the Arundells still owned property in Marshwood and Whitchurch Canonicorum parishes in 1775 when they were termed part of Chideock manor (AR/8/329).

 

Manorial centre was in Marshwood parish; tenements also in Whitchurch parish.

 

It is possible that the Arundells only ever owned lands in Marshwood parish, not the manor.

 

Hackeridge in Marshwood parish was originally part of this manor but became a manor in its own right in circa 1317 (See Manor of Hackeridge above).

 

Manor of Melbury Osmond: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1522 (AR/2/1262); possibly granted to Wardour Arundells.

 

Manorial centre was in Melbury Osmond parish.

 

Manor of Moorbath: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); possibly later became part of Chideock manor (AR/2/1265).

 

Manorial centre was in Symondsbury parish.

 

Manor of Powerstock: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1475 (AR/2/1229); possibly only belonged to the Arundells for the lifetime of Katherine Arundell nee Chideock.

 

Manorial centre was in Powerstock parish.

 

Manor of Stourton Caundle: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1599 (AR/2/1326).

 

Manorial centre was in Stourton Caundle parish.

 

Manor of Symondsbury [?]: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); the Arundells still owned land in Symondsbury in 1729 (AR/28/33).

 

Manorial centre was in Symondsbury parish.

 

It is possible that the Arundells only ever owned lands there, not the manor.

 

Manor of Up Cerne: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in the possession of the Arundells in 1475 (AR/2/1229); possibly only belonged to the Arundells for the lifetime of Katherine Arundell nee Chideock.

 

Manorial centre was in Up Cerne parish.

 

Manor of Whitchurch Canonicorum [?]: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); the Arundells still owned lands in Whitchurch Canonicorum parish in 1775 (AR/1/898).

 

Manorial centre was in Whitchurch Canonicorum parish.

 

It is possible that the Arundells only ever owned lands there, not the manor.

 

Manor of Winterbourne Houghton: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); Arundells still owned half the manor in 1591 (AR/21/26; cf. AR/17/15).

 

Manorial centre was in Winterbourne Houghton parish.

 

Gloucestershire

 

Manor of Frampton on Severn: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1568 (AR/3/593).

 

Manorial centre was in Frampton on Severn parish.

 

Leicestershire

 

Manor of Allexton: purchased in 1568 and sold in 1574 (See AR/1/707).

 

Manorial centre was in Allexton parish.

 

Oxfordshire

 

Manor of Dornford: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells 1562 (AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Wootton parish.

 

Manor of Horley: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); sold in 1553 (AR/1/709).

 

Manorial centre was in Horley parish.

 

Manor of Ilbury: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1574 (AR/2/1395).

 

Manorial centre was in Deddington parish.

 

Manor of Merton: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1574 (AR/2/1395).

 

Manorial centre was in Merton parish.

 

Manor of Mollington: see under Warwickshire.

 

Manor of North Stoke: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1574 (AR/2/1395).

 

Manorial centre was in Crowmarsh parish.

 

Known as 'Stokebasset' and 'Stoke Meols' manor.

 

Manor of Over Worton: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1574 (AR/2/1395).

 

Manorial centre was in Over Worton parish.

 

Manor of Rousham: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1574 (AR/2/1395).

 

Manorial centre was in Rousham parish.

 

Manor of Sesswell's Barton: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1576 (AR/1/711).

 

Manorial centre was in Steeple Barton parish.

 

Manor of Souldern: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1576 (AR/1/717).

 

Manorial centre was in Souldern parish; tenement also in Barford St Michael parish.

 

Manor of Steeple Aston: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1562 (AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Steeple Aston parish.

 

Manor of Wendlebury: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1562 ( AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Wendlebury parish.

 

Manor of Wykham: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1562 ( AR/2/1306).

 

Manorial centre was in Banbury parish.

 

Somerset

 

Manor of Allowenshay: acquired in 1469 as part of Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in the possession of the Arundells in 1522 ( AR/2/1262).

 

Manorial centre was in Kingstone parish.

 

Kingstone and Ludney, sometimes termed as manors in their own right, have been placed under Allowenshay.

 

Manor of Isle Brewers: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in the possession of the Arundells in 1544 ( AR/2/1322).

 

Manorial centre was in Isle Brewers parish.

 

Manor of Pitney Werne: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); the Arundells still owned the manor in 1544 (AR/2/684) and possibly still owned lands there in 1774 (AR/3/594).

 

Manorial centre was in Pitney parish.

 

Manor of Buckland Dinham: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in the possession of the Arundells in 1542 (AR/19/46) and possibly in 1560 (AR/2/695; if identification of this court roll is correct).

 

Manorial centre was in Buckland Dinham parish.

 

Manor of Corton Denham: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1576 ( AR/1/762-3).

 

Manorial centre was in Corton Denham parish.

 

Surrey

 

Manor of Ravensbury: unclear when or how acquired - first appears in the possession of the Arundells in 1446 ( AR/19/7) and its last appearance in the archive is in 1471 ( AR/19/13).

 

Manorial centre was in Morden parish.

 

Warwickshire

 

Manor of Mollington: a quarter-share acquired in 1501 as part of the Dinham inheritance (See Manor of Bodardle above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1553 (AR/2/1303).

 

Manorial centre was in Mollington parish.

 

Mollington parish was transferred to Oxfordshire in 1895.

 

Wiltshire

 

Manor of Stourton: acquired in 1560 as a result of the marriage of John Arundell to Ann, widow of Charles, Lord Stourton (See Arundell Family above); latest reference to it being in the possession of the Arundells is 1569 (AR/2/1272) so their interest may only have been for Ann's lifetime.

 

Manorial centre was in Stourton parish.

 

Manor of Westbury: acquired in 1469 as part of the Chideock inheritance (See Manor of Atram above); still in possession of the Arundells in 1544 ( AR/2/1322).

 

Manorial centre was in Westbury parish.

Unpublished Finding Aids:
  • AR/1 TITLE DEEDS

     

    Cornwall

     

    AR/1/1 - 48 Treloy

     

    AR/1/49 - 98 Trembleath

     

    AR/1/99 - 100 Mitchell

     

    AR/1/101 - 107 Connerton

     

    AR/1/108 - 172 Lanherne

     

    AR/1/173 - 183 St Columb

     

    AR/1/184 - 200 Carminow

     

    AR/1/201 - 205 Kennall

     

    AR/1/206 - 209 Truro Vean

     

    AR/1/210 - 218 Prospidnick

     

    AR/1/219 - 225 Tolverne

     

    AR/1/226 - 227 Reperry

     

    AR/1/228 - 233 Enniscaven

     

    AR/1/234 - 247 Lambourn

     

    AR/1/248 - 274 Lanhadron

     

    AR/1/275 - 294 Goran

     

    AR/1/295 - 303 Treloweth

     

    AR/1/304 - 305 Tregarne Condurrow

     

    AR/1/306 - 308 Tregustick

     

    AR/1/309 - 369 Bodwannick

     

    AR/1/370 - 374 Carvedras

     

    AR/1/376 - 394 Perlees [1/375 not used]

     

    AR/1/395 - 406 Bodardle

     

    AR/1/407 - 414 Cardinham

     

    AR/1/415 Gurlyn

     

    AR/1/416 - 430 Bejowan

     

    AR/1/431 Domellick

     

    AR/1/432 - 434 Roseworthy

     

    AR/1/435 - 451 Tregenna

     

    AR/1/452 - 453 Tresithney

     

    AR/1/454 - 461 Trevisker

     

    AR/1/462 - 482 Newland Preeze

     

    AR/1/483 - 527 Trevean tenements

     

    Buckinghamshire

     

    AR/1/528 Cuddington

     

    AR/1/529 - 545 Oving

     

    Devon

     

    AR/1/546 Morchard Arundell

     

    AR/1/547 - 548 Battishorne

     

    AR/1/549 Ideford

     

    AR/1/550 Luscott

     

    AR/1/551 - 558 Clayhidon

     

    AR/1/559 - 561 Dunterton

     

    AR/1/562 - 575 Harpford

     

    AR/1/576 - 630 Hartland

     

    AR/1/631 - 632 Ilsington

     

    AR/1/633 Matford

     

    AR/1/634 - 635 Offwell

     

    AR/1/636 - 639 Whiteheathfield

     

    AR/1/640 - 643 Woodhuish

     

    Dorset

     

    AR/1/644 - 646 Atram

     

    AR/1/647 - 656 Chideock

     

    AR/1/657 - 658 Fifehead Neville

     

    AR/1/659 - 666 Hackeridge

     

    AR/1/667 Hydes

     

    AR/1/668 - 679 Marshwood

     

    AR/1/680 - 684 Moorbath

     

    AR/1/685 - 688 Symondsbury

     

    AR/1/689 Upcerne

     

    AR/1/690 - 704 Whitchurch Canonicorum

     

    AR/1/705 Winterbourne Houghton

     

    Gloucestershire

     

    AR/1/706 Frampton on Severn

     

    Leicestershire

     

    AR/1/707 Allexton

     

    Monmouthshire

     

    AR/1/708 Mathenni

     

    Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/709 Horley

     

    AR/1/710 Ipsden

     

    AR/1/711 Sesswell's Barton

     

    AR/1/712 Somerton

     

    AR/1/713 - 717 Souldern

     

    Somerset

     

    AR/1/718 - 760 Allowenshay

     

    AR/1/761 - 763 Corton Denham

     

    AR/1/764 - 790 Pitney Wern

     

    Wiltshire

     

    AR/1/791 Stourton

     

    AR/1/792 Westbury

     

    Title deeds - manorial affiliation unclear

     

    AR/1/793 - 827 Cornwall

     

    AR/1/828 - 832 Devon

     

    AR/1/833 - 834 Dorset

     

    AR/1/835 - 838 Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/839 Somerset

     

    AR/1/840 Dorset or Somerset

     

    Title deeds for more than one manor

     

    AR/1/841 - 872 Cornwall

     

    AR/1/873 - 884 Devon

     

    AR/1/885 - 887 Dorset

     

    AR/1/888 Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/889 Somerset

     

    AR/1/890 Cornwall and Devon

     

    AR/1/891 - 901 Cornwall and Dorset

     

    AR/1/902 - 903 Cornwall, Devon and Somerset

     

    AR/1/904 Cornwall, Somerset and Wiltshire

     

    AR/1/905 - 910 Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/911 Devon and Buckinghamshire

     

    AR/1/912 Devon and Somerset

     

    AR/1/913 Devon, Somerset and Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/914 Dorset and Hampshire

     

    AR/1/915 Dorset and Somerset

     

    AR/1/916 - 918 Dorset, Somerset and Northamptonshire

     

    AR/1/919 - 923 Whole estate

     

    Title deeds - leasehold property

     

    AR/1/924 Cornwall - Trewithnow

     

    AR/1/925 - 927 Carnanton

     

    AR/1/928 Colquite

     

    AR/1/929 Gluvian Flamank

     

    AR/1/930 Lanteglos and Helsbury

     

    AR/1/931 Traffal

     

    AR/1/932 - 934 Gwarnick

     

    AR/1/935 Hampshire

     

    AR/1/936 - 937 Middlesex

     

    AR/1/938 - 942 Somerset - Compton Dundon

     

    AR/1/943 Godminster

     

    Title deeds for non-Arundell property

     

    AR/1/944 - 1012 Cornwall

     

    AR/1/1013 - 1019 Buckinghamshire

     

    AR/1/1020 - 1059 Devon

     

    AR/1/1060 - 1076 Dorset

     

    AR/1/1077 Gloucestershire

     

    AR/1/1078 - 1080 Hertfordshire

     

    AR/1/1081 Isle of Wight

     

    AR/1/1082 - 1085 Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/1086 Shropshire

     

    AR/1/1087 - 1109 Somerset

     

    AR/1/1110 Suffolk

     

    AR/1/1111 - 1112 Surrey

     

    AR/1/1113 - 1115 Warwickshire

     

    AR/1/1116 Wiltshire

     

    AR/1/1117 Cornwall, Cheshire and Lancashire

     

    AR/1/1118 - 1120 Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire

     

    AR/1/1121 Cambridgeshire, Oxfordshire and Surrey

     

    AR/2 MANORIAL RECORDS

     

    SINGLE MANORS

     

    Cornwall

     

    AR/2/1 - 46 Treloy

     

    AR/2/47 - 89 Trembleath

     

    AR/2/90 - 91 Mitchell

     

    AR/2/92 - 98 Connerton

     

    AR/2/99 - 120 Penwith Hundred

     

    AR/2/121 - 179 Lanherne

     

    AR/2/180 - 216 St Columb

     

    AR/2/217 - 233 Carminow

     

    AR/2/234 - 236 Kennall

     

    AR/2/237 - 248 Winnington

     

    AR/2/249 - 251 Truro Vean

     

    AR/2/252 - 267 Prospidnick

     

    AR/2/268 - 278 Pengwedna

     

    AR/2/279 - 299 Reperry

     

    AR/2/300 - 319 Enniscaven

     

    AR/2/320 - 336 Bodbrane

     

    AR/2/337 - 338 Lambourn

     

    AR/2/339 - 379 Lanhadron

     

    AR/2/380 - 385 Tregarne Condurrow

     

    AR/2/386 - 417 Bodwannick

     

    AR/2/418 - 425 Perlees

     

    AR/2/426 Colquite

     

    AR/2/427 - 433 Bodardle

     

    AR/2/434 - 453 Cardinham

     

    AR/2/454 - 462 Downinney

     

    AR/2/463 Gurlyn

     

    AR/2/464 - 466 Bejowan

     

    AR/2/467 Domellick

     

    AR/2/468 - 472 Roseworthy

     

    AR/2/473 - 478 Tregenna

     

    AR/2/479 Tregorrick

     

    AR/2/480 - 486 Tresithney

     

    AR/2/487 Newland Preeze

     

    Devon

     

    AR/2/488 - 491 Ideford

     

    AR/2/492 Loddiswell

     

    AR/2/493 Broad Clyst

     

    AR/2/494 - 504 Clayhidon

     

    AR/2/505 - 507 Dunterton

     

    AR/2/508 - 518 Harpford

     

    AR/2/519 - 567 Hartland (manor, borough and hundred)

     

    AR/2/568 Kingskerswell

     

    AR/2/569 - 572 Newton Poppleford

     

    AR/2/573 - 579 Southbrook

     

    [AR/2/580 - 595 not used]

     

    AR/2/596 - 638 Venn Ottery

     

    Dorset

     

    AR/2/639 Burcombe

     

    AR/2/640 Burton

     

    AR/2/641 - 651 Chideock

     

    AR/2/652 - 653 Powerstock

     

    AR/2/654 - 657 Winterbourne Houghton

     

    Somerset

     

    AR/2/658 Allowenshay

     

    AR/2/659 Isle Brewers

     

    AR/2/660 - 693 Pitney Werne

     

    AR/2/694 - 712 Buckland Dinham

     

    Wiltshire

     

    AR/2/713 Westbury

     

    Manorial records for non-Arundell property

     

    AR/2/714 - 719 Cornwall

     

    AR/2/714 Anhell

     

    AR/2/715 Philleigh

     

    AR/2/716 Tregarrick

     

    AR/2/717 Meledor

     

    AR/2/718 Polsue

     

    AR/2/719 Duchy of Cornwall manors

     

    AR/2/720 - 722 Cumberland - Greystoke

     

    AR/2/723 Essex - Shalford[?]

     

    AR/2/724 - 727 Devon

     

    AR/2/724 Aller

     

    AR/2/725 Axminster Hundred

     

    AR/2/726 Harleston

     

    AR/2/727/1 Sampford Peverell

     

    AR/2/727/2 - 16 South Pool

     

    AR/2/728 Somerset - Maperton

     

    AR/2/729 - 730 Warwickshire - Harbury

     

    AR/2/731 Unidentified - Middelond

     

    COMPOSITE RECORDS

     

    Inherited Court Rolls (including non-Arundell land)

     

    AR/2/732 - 737 Cornwall - Earl of Oxford manors

     

    AR/2/738 Somerset

     

    AR/2/739 Warwickshire

     

    Arundell Court Rolls

     

    AR/2/740 - 820 Cornwall

     

    AR/2/821 - 822 Devon

     

    AR/2/823 - 825 Somerset

     

    AR/2/826 Dorset and Gloucestershire

     

    AR/2/827 Devon, Dorset and Gloucestershire

     

    AR/2/828 - 836 Devon and Gloucestershire

     

    Inherited Manorial Accounts (including non-Arundell land)

     

    AR/2/837 - 840 Cornwall - Lambourn manors

     

    AR/2/841 - 842 Dinham manors

     

    AR/2/843 - 857 Earl of Oxford manors

     

    AR/2/858 - 864 Devon

     

    AR/2/865 Somerset

     

    AR/2/866 - 884 Several counties

     

    Arundell Manorial Accounts

     

    AR/2/885 - 1215 Cornwall

     

    AR/2/1216 - 1220 Dorset

     

    AR/2/1221 - 1225 Somerset

     

    AR/2/1226 - 1274 Several counties - Chideock manors

     

    AR/2/1275 - 1319 Dinham manors

     

    AR/2/1320 - 1332 Various manors

     

    Inherited Rentals (including non-Arundell land)

     

    AR/2/1333 Cornwall

     

    AR/2/1334 Devon

     

    AR/2/1335 Several counties - Dinham manors

     

    Arundell Rentals

     

    AR/2/1336 - 1391 Cornwall

     

    AR/2/1392 - 1393 Devon

     

    AR/2/1394 Dorset

     

    AR/2/1395 - 1398 Several counties

     

    ESTATE MANAGEMENT

     

    AR/3 GENERAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT PAPERS

     

    Cornwall

     

    AR/3/1 - 24 Treloy

     

    AR/3/25 - 53 Trembleath

     

    AR/3/54 - 76 Mitchell

     

    AR/3/77 - 114 Connerton

     

    AR/3/115 - 143 Hundred of Penwith

     

    AR/3/144 - 252 Lanherne [228 - 233 Lanherne Mill 234 - 252 Lanherne Barton]

     

    AR/3/253 - 284 St Columb

     

    AR/3/285 - 293 Carminow

     

    AR/3/294 - 303 Kennall

     

    AR/3/304 - 312 Winnington

     

    AR/3/313 - 319 Truro Vean

     

    AR/3/320 - 322 Prospidnick

     

    AR/3/323 Pengwedna

     

    AR/3/324 - 336 Reperry

     

    AR/3/337 Enniscaven

     

    AR/3/338 - 346 Bodbrane

     

    AR/3/347 Lambourn

     

    AR/3/348 - 379 Lanhadron

     

    AR/3/380 - 382 Tregarne Condurrow

     

    AR/3/383 Tregustick

     

    AR/3/384 - 392 Bodwannick

     

    AR/3/393 - 405 Perlees

     

    AR/3/406 - 425 Bodardle

     

    AR/3/426 - 454 Cardinham

     

    AR/3/455 - 456 Gurlyn

     

    AR/3/457 - 465 Bejowan

     

    AR/3/466 - 467 Domellick

     

    AR/3/468 - 482 Roseworthy

     

    AR/3/483 - 490 Tregenna

     

    AR/3/491 Tregorrick

     

    AR/3/492 - 498 Tresithney

     

    AR/3/499 Trevisker

     

    AR/3/500 - 502 Newland Preeze

     

    Devon

     

    AR/3/503 'Braunton'

     

    AR/3/504 Gratton

     

    AR/3/505 - 521 Loddiswell

     

    AR/3/522 Spreacombe

     

    AR/3/523 - 528 Dunterton

     

    AR/3/529 - 565 Hartland

     

    [AR/3/566 not used]

     

    Dorset

     

    AR/3/567 - 592 Chideock

     

    Gloucestershire

     

    AR/3/593 Frampton on Severn

     

    Somerset

     

    AR/3/594 Pitney Werne

     

    Wiltshire

     

    AR/3/595 - 596 Westbury

     

    Leasehold Property

     

    AR/3/597 - 604 Carnanton

     

    AR/3/605 - 621 Gwarnick

     

    AR/3/622 Grosvenor Street, London

     

    General Estate Management

     

    AR/3/623 - 871 More than one manor

     

    AR/4 LEASES

     

    Cornwall

     

    AR/4/1 - 61 Treloy

     

    AR/4/62 - 192 Trembleath

     

    AR/4/193 - 195 Mitchell

     

    AR/4/196 - 368 Connerton

     

    AR/4/369 - 518 Lanherne

     

    AR/4/519 - 778 St Columb

     

    AR/4/779 - 945 Carminow

     

    AR/4/946 - 980 Kennall

     

    AR/4/981 - 1003 Winnington

     

    AR/4/1004 - 1056 Truro Vean

     

    AR/4/1057 - 1095 Prospidnick

     

    AR/4/1096 - 1139 Pengwedna

     

    AR/4/1140 - 1193 Reperry

     

    AR/4/1194 - 1215 Enniscaven

     

    AR/4/1216 - 1258 Bodbrane

     

    AR/4/1259 - 1444 Lanhadron

     

    AR/4/1445 - 1465 Tregarne Condurrow

     

    AR/4/1466 - 1594 Bodwannick

     

    AR/4/1595 - 1618 Perlees

     

    AR/4/1619 - 1626 Bodardle

     

    AR/4/1627 - 1743 Cardinham

     

    AR/4/1744 - 1804 Bejowan

     

    AR/4/1805 - 1807 Domellick

     

    AR/4/1808 - 1862 Roseworthy

     

    AR/4/1863 - 1948 Tregenna

     

    AR/4/1949 - 1965 Tregorrick

     

    AR/4/1966 - 1992 Tresithney

     

    AR/4/1993 - 2009 Newland Preeze

     

    Devon

     

    AR/4/2010 - 2011 Morchard Arundell

     

    AR/4/2012 - 2016 Uton Arundell

     

    AR/4/2017 Gratton

     

    AR/4/2018 - 2034 Loddiswell

     

    AR/4/2035 - 2036 Luscott

     

    AR/4/2037 Clayhidon

     

    AR/4/2038 - 2039 Dunterton

     

    AR/4/2040 Harpford

     

    AR/4/2041 - 2072 Hartland

     

    AR/4/2073 - 2074 Ilsington

     

    AR/4/2075 - 2076 Kingskerswell

     

    AR/4/2077 - 2080 Matford

     

    AR/4/2081 Whiteheathfield

     

    AR/4/2082 - 2083 Woodhuish

     

    Dorset

     

    AR/4/2084/1 Buckhorn Weston

     

    AR/4/2084/2 Burcombe

     

    AR/4/2085 - 2098 Chideock

     

    AR/4/2099 - 2101 Fifehead Neville

     

    AR/4/2102 - 2103 Hackeridge

     

    AR/4/2104 - 2106 Hydes

     

    AR/4/2107 - 2110 Winterbourne Houghton

     

    Oxfordshire

     

    AR/4/2111 Dornford

     

    AR/4/2112 - 2113 Rousham

     

    AR/4/2114 Steeple Aston

     

    AR/4/2115 Wykham

     

    Somerset

     

    AR/4/2116 - 2119 Pitney Wern

     

    Wiltshire

     

    AR/4/2120 Stourton

     

    Manorial affiliation unclear

     

    AR/4/2121 - 2127 Cornwall

     

    AR/4/2128 Berkshire

     

    AR/4/2129 Dorset

     

    Leases for more than one manor

     

    AR/4/2130 - 2153 Cornwall

     

    AR/4/2154 - 2158 Devon

     

    AR/4/2159 Somerset

     

    AR/4/2160 - 2176 Several counties

     

    Leasehold property

     

    AR/4/2177 - 2178 Carnanton

     

    AR/4/2179 - 2180 Gwarnick

     

    AR/5 LETTING SURVEYS AND CONTRACTS FOR LEASES

     

    AR/5/1 - 3 Trelay

     

    AR/5/4 - 7 Trembleath

     

    AR/5/8 Mitchell

     

    AR/5/9 - 34 Connerton

     

    AR/5/35 - 41 Lanherne

     

    AR/5/42 - 58 St Columb

     

    AR/5/59 - 63 Carminow

     

    AR/5/64 - 67 Kennall

     

    AR/5/68 - 70 Winnington

     

    AR/5/71 - 75 Truro Vean

     

    AR/5/76 Prospidnick

     

    AR/5/77 Pengwedna

     

    AR/5/78 Reperry

     

    AR/5/79 Enniscaven

     

    AR/5/80 - 84 Bodbrane

     

    AR/5/85 - 99 Lanhadron

     

    AR/5/100 - 105 Bodwannick

     

    AR/5/106 - 107 Perlees

     

    AR/5/108 - 115 Cardinham

     

    AR/5/116 - 118 Bejowan

     

    AR/5/119 - 122 Roseworthy

     

    AR/5/123 - 128 Tregenna

     

    AR/5/129 Tregorrick

     

    AR/5/130 Tresithney

     

    AR/5/131 - 133 Newland Preeze

     

    AR/5/134 Newlyn in Paul

     

    AR/5/135 - 155 Several manors

     

    (Cornwall and Chideock)

     

    AR/6/1 - 20 SURVEYS AND VALUATIONS

     

    AR/7/1 - 43 BONDS

     

    AR/8 FINANCIAL RECORDS

     

    AR/8/1 - 296 General - Cornwall and out-county

     

    AR/8/297 - 303 Devon

     

    AR/8/304 - 307 Several counties

     

    AR/8/308 - 340 Annuities

     

    AR/8/341 - 410 Bills

     

    AR/8/411 - 527 Receipts

     

    AR/9/1 - 8 MISCELLANEOUS ESTATE PAPERS

     

    AR/10/1 - 867 ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE

     

    AR/11 FARM RECORDS

     

    AR/11/1 - 21 General

     

    AR/11/22 - 65 Accounts and Financial Papers

     

    AR/11/66 - 120 Bills and Receipts

     

    AR/12 HOUSEHOLD RECORDS

     

    AR/12/1 - 16 General

     

    AR/12/17 - 24 Inventories

     

    AR/12/25 - 49 Accounts and Financial Papers

     

    AR/12/50 - 113 Bills and Receipts

     

    AR/12/114 - 135 Lanherne Building Accounts and Bills

     

    AR/13/1 - 16 RECORDS OF EMPLOYEES

     

    AR/14 TIN AND MINING RECORDS

     

    AR/14/1 - 54 General

     

    AR/14/55 - 146 Accounts and Financial Papers

     

    AR/14/147 - 190 Correspondence

     

    AR/14/191 - 213 Ore Samples

     

    AR/14/214 St Austell

     

    AR/14/215 - 222 Breage

     

    AR/14/223 - 226 St Columb Major

     

    AR/14/227 - 231 St Columb Minor

     

    AR/14/232 - 240 Crowan

     

    AR/14/241 - 255 St Dennis

     

    AR/14/256 - 257 St Eval

     

    AR/14/258 - 259 Gunwalloe

     

    AR/14/260 - 352 Gwennap

     

    AR/14/353 - 407 Gwinear

     

    AR/14/408 - 412 Gwithian

     

    AR/14/413 St Ives

     

    AR/14/414 - 424 Lanivet

     

    AR/14/425 - 426 Lelant

     

    AR/14/427 - 453 St Mewan (including Polgooth)

     

    AR/14/454 Phillack

     

    AR/14/455 - 464 Sithney

     

    AR/14/465 - 466 Stithians

     

    AR/15/1 - 204 RECORDS RELATING TO RIGHT OF WRECK

     

    AR/16/1 - 64 ECCLESIASTICAL RECORDS

     

    AR/17 LEGAL RECORDS

     

    AR/17/1 - 62 General

     

    AR/17/63 - 69 Bonds and releases

     

    AR/17/70 - 232 Legal cases

     

    AR/18/1 - 20 MAPS AND PLANS

     

    FAMILY PAPERS

     

    AR/19/1 - 81 MARRIAGE, JOINTURE AND DOWRY

     

    AR/20/1 - 71 FAMILY TRUSTS

     

    AR/21/1 - 65 PROBATE

     

    AR/22/1 - 46 PUBLIC OFFICE

     

    AR/23/1 - 10 ROYAL PARDONS AND LICENCES

     

    AR/24/1 - 35 ARUNDELLS IN ADMINISTRATIVE ROLES

     

    AR/25/1 - 141 PERSONAL CORRESPONDENCE

     

    AR/26/1 - 35 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PAPERS

     

    AR/27/1 - 18 RELIGION

     

    AR/28/1 - 42 RECUSANCY

     

    AR/29/1 - 37 GENEALOGY

     

    AR/30/1 - 17 MISCELLANEOUS FAMILY PAPERS

     

    RECORDS OF OTHER FAMILIES

     

    AR/31/1 - 2 ARCHES

     

    AR/32/1 - 12 ARUNDELL OF TRERICE

     

    AR/33/1 - 15 BELLINGS

     

    AR/34/1 - 12 BERE

     

    AR/35/1 - 2 CARMINOW

     

    AR/36/1 - 6 CHIDEOCK

     

    AR/37/1 - 61 DINHAM

     

    AR/37/1 - 23 General

     

    AR/37/24 - 29 Marriage

     

    AR/37/30 - 31 Probate

     

    AR/37/32 - 34 Inventories

     

    AR/37/35 - 36 Household Accounts

     

    AR/37/37 - 58 Travel Accounts

     

    AR/37/59 - 61 Personal Correspondence

     

    AR/38/1 - 3 FITZPAYNE

     

    AR/39/1 - 2 FITZWARYN

     

    AR/40/1 - 9 GIFFORD

     

    AR/41/1 - 11 LAMBOURN

     

    AR/42/1 - 5 LANHADRON

     

    AR/43 PETRE

     

    AR/44 PHILPOTT

     

    AR/45 ROCHE

     

    AR/46/1 - 13 SOOR

     

    AR/47/1 - 2 STOURTON

     

    AR/48/1 - 10 PRINTED AND PICTORIAL MATERIAL

     

    AR/49/1 - 12 HISTORY OF THE ARCHIVE

     

    AR/50/1 - 17 MISCELLANEOUS

Subjects:
  • Cornwall
Creator Names:
  • Arundell family, Barons Arundell of Wardour
  • Arundell family of Lanherne, Cornwall
  • Arundell family of Trerice, Cornwall
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