An Historical Report of the Title which the Crown of England hath unto the realm of Ireland, abstracted out of the printed book of the Statutes of Ireland in the Act of the Attainder of Shane O'Neale, 11 Eliz. 1567.

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Details of An Historical Report of the Title which the Crown of England hath unto the realm of Ireland, abstracted out of the printed book of the Statutes of Ireland in the Act of the Attainder of Shane O'Neale, 11 Eliz. 1567.
Title: An Historical Report of the Title which the Crown of England hath unto the realm of Ireland, abstracted out of the printed book of the Statutes of Ireland in the Act of the Attainder of Shane O'Neale, 11 Eliz. 1567.
Description:

Gurmund, King of Great Brittannye and son to King Belin, was Lord of Bayon in Spain, from where the Biscaynes came first into Ireland and were his subjects, whereby it follows that Ireland ought to be under the dominion of the Kings of Great Brittannye. Exiled Biscaynes in 60 ships were met at sea (near unto the Isles of the Orchades), with King Gurmund in his return from his conquests in Denmark. The captains of the Biscayn fleet, Hiberus and Hermon, besought the King to assign them some place where they might inhabit; the King, having commiseration of them, assigned them the land of Ireland, whereby it is evident that Ireland ought to be subject to the crown of Great Brittanye.

 

Dermond McMoroghe, the banished King of Leinster, submitted himself to King H. II., and became his liege man. His daughter and heir, Eva, married Richard Fits Gilbert, Earl of Struguill (or rather Pembrook), in Wales. He resigned all his right to King H. 2, and took again the land of Leinster of the King, which is a good title to Leinster.

 

In the year 1171 King H. II. in person went into Ireland; at Waterford Dermond King of Corke, of the nation of the McCarties, submitted himself to him and became his liege man. At Cashell, Donnell King of Limerick, of the nation of the O'Briens, swore fealty and homage to him. After that, Donald King of Ossery, McShaghlin King of Ophalye, and all the princes of the south of Ireland became his liege men. At Dublin, O'Carrell King of Uriell, O'Rwrk King of Meath, and Rotherick King of Connaght and Monarch of Ireland, with all the princes and men of account in the whole realm, swore fealty and homage to him and submitted themselves to tribute.

 

In the year 1185 K. H. II. gave the land of Ireland unto his youngest son, John, about which time he came in person into Ireland and held the same land. Immediately after the conquest the clergy of Ireland, being assembled at Armaghe, acknowledged that through sin of the people of the land, by the sentence of God, the mischief of conquest did befall them.

 

At Dublin and also here in Ireland there came to K. R. II. O'Neale of Ulster, O'Brien of Thomond, O'Conner of Connaghte, Art McMorrogh of Leinster, and all the rest of the captains of the Irishmen in Ireland swore fealty and homage to that King, whereby it appeareth evidently that Ireland is belonging and appertaining to the crown of England.

 

The Title which the Crown of England hath to the Kingdom of Ireland in general, and in particular to the Earldom of Ulster, proved by records abstracted out of the Act as above.

 

John de Courcye (sent by King H. II. into Ireland) conquered all Ulster, of whose companies in that service divers of their issues remain in that province at this day, vizt., the Savages, Jordons, FitzSimons, Chamberlaynes, Bensons, Russells, Awdleyes, Whites, and many others. John de Courcye died without heirs, and the King gave his conquests to Hugh de Lacy and his heirs, who left one only daughter and heir, married to Burgh. After three or four descents in Burgh it fell again unto a female heir, who was married to Lionell Duke of Clarence, third son to King Edw. III., whose daughter and sole heir Phillip was married to Edmund Mortimer Earl of March, who for many years enjoyed that large territory. He had issue Roger Mortimer Earl of Marche; who had issue Edmund, Anne, and Elinor. But Edmund and Elinor died sans issue, and Anne was married to Richard Earl of Cambridge, son to Edmund Duke of York, fifth son to King Ed. III., which said Richard had issue Richard Duke of York, father to King Edw. IV.; whereby it is evident that the earldom is the undoubted inheritance of the crown of England.

 

Farthermore, in a parliament held at Dublin in the 28 year of King H. VIII., by the consent of the three estates there assembled, the provinces of Ulster and Leinster and all the lands of the absentees were granted and confirmed and established to the King, his heirs and successors. In the 33 year of H. VIII., in a parliament held at Dublin, it was enacted that the King, his heirs and successors, should for ever afterwards be styled and intituled Kings of Ireland.

 

Copy.

Held by: Lambeth Palace Library, not available at The National Archives
Language: English
Extent: 6 Pages.
Unpublished Finding Aids:
  • Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 239.

Former Reference Department: MS 613, p. 51a

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